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Style is about making your own trends, not following somebody else.


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  • Unashamed Doesn't Mean Unafraid
    Story Politics
    Clock 9d

    Unashamed Doesn't Mean Unafraid

    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States


    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    Selfies are empowering, being treated like a zoo animal or a science exhibit every time you go out in public is not! Give people the space they need to live their lives and be #DisabledAndUnashamed. Don't co-opt disabled people's lives and experiences for your feel good moment, cautionary tale, or inspiring story. Always ask people, and get their express permission, before taking their picture and sharing it on social media, or sharing any personal or private information on social media. This doesn't just mean strangers. I'm talking about your friends and family too. Even if it's your kid, make sure they're comfortable with you sharing before you post on social media. Also, when it comes to strangers keep in mind that if you're not personally involved in the situation, and you never talk to the people that are, the story you think you're getting from a photograph may be completely different than the truth. Don't make the assumption that an able-bodied person helping a disabled person is performing some saintly altruistic deed for a total stranger. For all you know they could be friends, family, or have some other kind of pre-existing relationship that makes this a standard interaction for them. When you project your narrative on disabled people by photographing us without our consent, you often perpetuate the myth that being disabled is the worst thing that anyone can ever experience, when the truth is for many of us #disabledisnotabadthing. We have friends, colleagues, partners, and family members just like anybody else, all of whom may or may not be, or appear to be disabled. Random photos like this also perpetuate the assumption that if a person who appears to be able-bodied is interacting with a person who appears to be disabled they are doing something saintly or out of the ordinary, which is just not true. I don't care if you think you're recognizing a restaurant employee for "a random act of kindness" or whatever your reasoning is for posting a photo of personal story with identifying information without the subject's consent. You never know what will go viral. So just think, would you want to end up on CNN Breaking News because somebody took a photo of you just trying to eat your dinner at IHOP?

  • #ReadMyLips  I am Always Both: Thoughts on disabled identity and  womanhood  on #InternationalWomensDay
    Story Women's Rights
    Clock 4mo

    #ReadMyLips I am Always Both: Thoughts on disabled identity and womanhood on #InternationalWomensDay

    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States


    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

  • Changing The Image of Disability: Defining Anti-Inspiration Porn
    Story Life & Inspiration
    Clock 4mo

    Changing The Image of Disability: Defining Anti-Inspiration Porn

    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States


    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

  • #WhyIMarch: An Open Letter to Those Who Love Me, But Do Not See Me
    Story World Affairs
    Clock 5mo

    #WhyIMarch: An Open Letter to Those Who Love Me, But Do Not See Me

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    I am super honored to have my voice and perspective featured in this article about the growing conversation around disability representation in the fashion industry. I feel like one of my quote from the article sums up best why this issue is the deeply important, and not just a matter of vanity, or materialism. "This is also a dream for people like Karin Hitselberger, who devote their lives to studying an art that is more about self-expression than any high-end piece of fabric money could buy. “The whole idea behind choice in fashion comes from an emotional need to express yourself in a way that is authentic,” she said. “We can act like fashion is an exclusive club, but clothes are a standard of our society. Everybody wears them.” “So the idea of living somewhere where you have clothes that fit you and your body, and you have a choice that allows you to fit into an aesthetic that makes you feel confident, beautiful and fierce,” she added. “That’s what I want to see.”

  • What is Your Style?
    Story Fashion
    Clock 5mo

    What is Your Style?

    • 2 comments
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    • 2 comments
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    People often think of selfies as vanity, but for me, they are so much more than that! They have the power to change the narrative around the way we talk about people who have historically been invisible to the camera's lens

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    People often think of selfies as vanity, but for me, they are so much more than that! They have the power to change the narrative around the way we talk about people who have historically been invisible to the camera's lens

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    People often think of selfies as vanity, but for me, they are so much more than that! They have the power to change the narrative around the way we talk about people who have historically been invisible to the camera's lens

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    I'm sharing this because I feel like what a lot of people are struggling to understand right now is that a lot of the fear and anguish people, especially those of us with marginalized identities, are feeling after the election, is not really about politics. I know personally, the discomfort and anxiety I'm feeling has very little to do with Trump himself and a whole lot more to do with the bigotry and hate that has boiled to the surface during this election. I fear that people will use his election as an opportunity to mistreat those who are different from them. I fear that they will justify it with his words, his rhetoric.I genuinely hope that he will be a good president for all people, but I am afraid of what he has come to symbolize for many people. I hope that he leads this nation well, and can find ways to bridge the divide, but that doesn't mean I don't have reasons to feel scared.

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    Health inequalities can be dangerous, and even deadly. One of the ways we can go about trying to bridge the gaps that exist in healthcare and health outcomes is to make sure that health and healthcare research involves a variety of diverse groups of people, and is tailored to the real-life needs of members of these groups, rather than based on an outsider perspective. On October 21, 2016, UCP will be hosting the #speakforyourself convening, at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri! The convening will aim to start a discussion about how people with disabilities can become part of patient centered outcomes research, this is important, because people with disabilities, particularly women, face significantly different health outcomes than their nondisabled counterparts, for a variety of reasons, including things as simple as lack of accessibility at the doctors office. By engaging underrepresented groups of people, such as people with disabilities in health outcomes research, we truly do have the potential to change the future! What are some things that are important to you with regards to your health? What you wish doctors and medical professionals understood about your life and your body?

    • 5 comments
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    Thank you so much for sharing. This is a really important issue and I can't wait to see you on campus

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    Health inequalities can be dangerous, and even deadly. One of the ways we can go about trying to bridge the gaps that exist in healthcare and health outcomes is to make sure that health and healthcare research involves a variety of diverse groups of people, and is tailored to the real-life needs of members of these groups, rather than based on an outsider perspective. On October 21, 2016, UCP will be hosting the #speakforyourself convening, at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri! The convening will aim to start a discussion about how people with disabilities can become part of patient centered outcomes research, this is important, because people with disabilities, particularly women, face significantly different health outcomes than their nondisabled counterparts, for a variety of reasons, including things as simple as lack of accessibility at the doctors office. By engaging underrepresented groups of people, such as people with disabilities in health outcomes research, we truly do have the potential to change the future! What are some things that are important to you with regards to your health? What you wish doctors and medical professionals understood about your life and your body?

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    I wrote this intensely personal piece, exploring my relationship with October, my favorite month of the year, disability awareness month, and the month of my birth, because I firmly believe in embracing who you are, and for me being disabled is a part of that equation. It's not everything, but it does matter, and it's not a tragedy.

    • 1 comment
    Karin Hitselberger
    Washington, D.C., DC, United States

    Top Answer

    I wrote this intensely personal piece, exploring my relationship with October, my favorite month of the year, disability awareness month, and the month of my birth, because I firmly believe in embracing who you are, and for me being disabled is a part of that equation. It's not everything, but it does matter, and it's not a tragedy.

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