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DoYouKeepMakingtheSameMistakesTwice?

Jan Johnston Osburn
Jan Johnston Osburn Mogul Influencer | Career & Life Coach | Helping People Turn Dreams into Realities
1y Washington, DC, United States Story
Do You Keep Making the Same Mistakes Twice?

Falling For The Same Tricks

I recently read The Law of Agreement by Tony Burroughs. In an early chapter of this book, Burroughs tells the story of a dog named Rusty.

Rusty’s story is heartbreaking. The only life he knows is the life within about a 10 feet radius of his doghouse. He spends his days and nights in chains.

One day as Burroughs was walking by Rusty’s house, it was feeding time. He saw Rusty’s owner come out of his house, food bowl in hand. Rusty jumped up and started running toward his dinner.  The chain that bound him broke and Rusty was free. Once Rusty realized he wasn’t restricted by that chain, he was a new dog. He was happy. His tail wagged, he played, he rolled around on the ground... and then he made a run for it.

Go, Rusty, Go…

The owner called for him but Rusty didn’t come. So his owner went back inside and came out again. This time he was shaking the tin can of treats.

No, Rusty, No...

When Rusty heard this, he came running. The owner caught him and Rusty went back to his life of chains.

Burroughs surmised that Rusty had fallen for the same old tricks.

Are You Living Your Life in Chains?

What about you?

Are you falling for the same old tricks?

Are you like Rusty? Living your life in chains? And when you break free, do you fall for those same ole’ tricks that puts you back in chains?

We All Saw it Coming

Social media is the best of worlds and the worst of worlds. It’s a great way to keep in touch with friends and family that you rarely see. Pictures of babies, new puppies, graduations, vacations, and new romances adorn your feed.

But, pass the popcorn! It can also be like watching a train wreck.

You always know when people are falling for the same mistakes. Maybe it’s your friend who falls in love with “the one” every six weeks and is willing to risk upheaval in their life for the sake of love - only to be crushed, once again.

We all saw it coming, but they fell for the same ole tricks.

Maybe it’s the friend who tries to lose weight but continually posts pictures of desserts that they’ve made.

We all saw it coming, but they fell for the same ole tricks.

It might even be your friend who complains about not getting a promotion and raise but doesn’t hesitate to go out late on a Thursday night and call in sick on a Friday.

We all saw it coming, but they fell for the same ole tricks.

They then proclaim, “For the love of all that is great and good, why do I keep making those same mistakes?”

Because you fell for the same ole tricks!


How Do You Stop Making The Same Mistakes Twice?

You have to make your own way in this world and that also means you have to make your own mistakes.

If you feel you are falling for the same thing, the first question is why?

Is there some hidden reason that enables you to repeat the same pattern at the risk of your happiness and self-esteem? Are you able to identify clearly the reason you make the mistake time and time again?

A Little Insight Into Why You Do It

It’s Easier to Blame Someone Else Instead of Yourself: Sometimes you don’t want to learn to stop falling for the same trick. Too simplistic? Too Brutal? Perhaps. But, it’s a critical influence nonetheless. It’s too easy to fall into the excuse making trap rather than dealing with your own destruction.

The easy route is to place the blame on something that makes it seem like it’s out of our control. But, guess what? Our behavior is within our control. Don’t fool yourself. Learning from your mistakes means changing your habits, routines, and attitudes. That’s not always easy so you take the easy way out.

You Have to Un-learn in Order to Re-learn: When you do have to change your routines and habits, it’s not an overnight process. You have to ‘un-learn’ in order to ‘re-learn.’ If your mindset is such that you’ve convinced yourself that your efforts won’t make a difference, you’re less likely to learn. But when you change your thought pattern and you believe that you can learn something new, you’ve just increased your chances of overcoming your mistakes.

You Didn’t Get To The Core Issue: Let’s say that you want to quit smoking. You’re doing fine but one day that cigarette tricks you. Just one puff. Then you start smoking again. Why? What was the trigger? Stress? Friends who smoke? Getting to the core reason of why you fell for the trick means that you have to identify the trigger that started it. You have to get to the core in order to defeat it.

You Don’t Replace Bad Habits With Good Ones: Once you’ve identified your core cause, you have to replace the bad with something good. If you’ve identified that you start smoking when you hang out with your friend, Steve, because he doesn’t like smoking alone, then you know what you have to do. You have to do something about the time you spend with Steve until you get things under control. If you have discovered that you eat because you’re bored, then you have to fill in the boredom with something that takes your mind off of eating.

The Key is Reflection

Analyze what went wrong, study the cause-and-effect chain, and create a bird’s eye view so you can assemble the whole chain of events. Only then can you identify where you went wrong and come up with changes that will prevent you from making this mistake again.

If Rusty could have seen the chain of events, he may have made another choice.

So take a step back and ask yourself, are you really learning from your mistakes or are you falling for the same ole’ tricks.

I hope that Rusty learned to stop falling for the old treat-trick. I also hope that Rusty is running free and playing and has a house – not a dog house – to come home to every night.

Don’t be Rusty.


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4 comments

  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    1y ago

    Great message. It's interesting to think about how we can sit in situations when we know they are not right, and not make the decision to make a change, or at least take a small step. It's like you have to be ready with your entire being to WANT to make a change and not make the same mistakes twice.

    Great message. It's interesting to think about how we can sit in situations when we know they are not right, and not make the decision to make a change, or at least take a small step. It's like you have to be ready with your entire being to WANT to make a change and not make the same mistakes twice.

    • Jan Johnston Osburn
      Jan Johnston Osburn Mogul Influencer | Career & Life Coach | Helping People Turn Dreams into Realities
      1y ago

      Thank you, Bethany. As an animal lover, I was heartbroken over the image of Rusty in chains but I think that story is a very powerful story. He made his break for freedom and was tricked into going back into chains. Very vivid image. I also agree with you. Just WANTING to change isn't always enough. It's a bit deeper than that. Happy Friday!

      Thank you, Bethany. As an animal lover, I was heartbroken over the image of Rusty in chains but I think that story is a very powerful story. He made his break for freedom and was tricked into going back into chains. Very vivid image. I also agree with you. Just WANTING to change isn't always enough. It's a bit deeper than that. Happy Friday!

  • Courtney Dercqu
    Courtney Dercqu Influencer
    1y ago

    Great post, Jan! I really love how active you have become on the Mogul platform. Your posts never cease to inspire me, and I hope that same sentiment is shared with my peers. What you mention here is spot on, especially as it relates to a lot of young people and their love lives. I think most of us have friends or had them, who found themselves in dysfunctional partnerships and would keep going back, and then come to us complaining again when things (shocker) went right back to the way they were. Why do you think so many of us become complacent? Like Rusty, we don't like how our current situation is, yet, we are resolute to do anything about it.

    Great post, Jan! I really love how active you have become on the Mogul platform. Your posts never cease to inspire me, and I hope that same sentiment is shared with my peers. What you mention here is spot on, especially as it relates to a lot of young people and their love lives. I think most of us have friends or had them, who found themselves in dysfunctional partnerships and would keep going back, and then come to us complaining again when things (shocker) went right back to the way they were. Why do you think so many of us become complacent? Like Rusty, we don't like how our current situation is, yet, we are resolute to do anything about it.

  • cjhinesy
    cjhinesy Writer, editor
    1y ago

    Gosh! This spoke to my heart--falling for the same ole tricks. My problem is overeating. I haven't been reflecting on why I do it (boredom, loneliness, frustration) and I need to do that, and develop a plan to replace the bad with the good. Thanks for your insight!

    Gosh! This spoke to my heart--falling for the same ole tricks. My problem is overeating. I haven't been reflecting on why I do it (boredom, loneliness, frustration) and I need to do that, and develop a plan to replace the bad with the good. Thanks for your insight!


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Jan Johnston Osburn
Mogul Influencer | Career & Life Coach | Helping People Turn Dreams into Realities

Johnston Osburn is a Career and Life Coach who helps people turn dreams into realities. After years as a Global Talent Acquisition Professional, she realized how frequently people limit themselves because they lack belief in their abilities. They are afraid to dream, let alone dream big. [...]

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