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#AskAMogul:Hi,thisisAnneMarieCummings&GustavoVelasquez.WearethestarsoftheDaytimeEmmy-nominateddigitalseries,"ConversationsinLA".Askusanything!YourquestionswillbeansweredLIVE4/23@1pmET.

Anne Marie Cummings
Anne Marie Cummings Creator, Writer, Director, Star & and Executive Producer of Daytime Emmy-Award nominated series, “Conversations in L.A.”
1y Los Angeles, CA, USA Conversation

Your questions will be answered on Monday, April 23rd at 1pm ET. To ask a question, click here to create a Mogul profile, then post a question in the comment section below!

Hi! We are Anne Marie Cummings and Gustavo Velasquez. We are currently starring in the Daytime Emmy-Award nominated digital series, Conversations in L.A. 

Conversations in L.A. is not your traditional May-December romance. It’s an unconventional love story about Michelle Macabee, a menopausal woman in the midst of her midlife crisis. While coping with the death of her dog, she meets Gus Borrero, a young Hispanic millennial. They discover they have a true soul connection and fall in love. However, their age difference and their opponents create obstacle after obstacle as they transition from lovers, roommates, married partners, to parents.

Seasons One and Two of “Conversations in L.A.” just released in September, 2017 on iTunes and Amazon Prime in the U.S.A., U.K., AU, and CANADA, and in January, 2018, was released on iTunes with Spanish subtitles (in Season One, there are even two episodes spoken in Spanish with English subtitles). On Amazon Prime, “Conversations in L.A.” has been placed on the “Recommended TV” list and is alongside all the top, Primetime award-winning series. Today, we are proudly in production for Season Three.

The series has received multiple Daytime Emmy nominations, including: Anne Marie Cummings for Outstanding Lead Actress; Gustavo Velasquez for Outstanding Lead Actor; and Vanita Harbour for Outstanding Supporting Actress. In 2018 it received two Daytime Emmy nominations: Anne Marie Cummings for Writing and Mike E. Winfield for Outstanding Guest Actor.

We invite you to check out our bios below, and to ask us anything! Please write your questions in the comments section below and we'll answer the questions live on Monday, April 23rd at 1pm ET.

ANNE MARIE CUMMINGS 

Since moving to Los Angeles in 2015, Cummings studied screenwriting with Ron Osborn (writer for the award-winning TV shows “Moonlighting” and “The West Wing”) and wrote her first screenplay, a culinary romantic comedy, “Eat Bitter, Taste Sweet” -  to be directed by Wendey Stanzler (“Sex and the City”). Cummings simultaneously started her film production company, Immediate Vision Productions, which uses Cummings’ vast experiences in the theatre to create projects that merge theatre onto film and television in a unique and daring way.

Cummings’ first digital drama series, where she is the creator, writer, director, star (and executive producer), is for a single-shot digital drama series called “Conversations in L.A.” The series has received five Daytime Emmy nominations in the category of Digital Drama Series from The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences…

In 2017 – For Anne Marie Cummings, Outstanding Lead Actress. For Gustavo Velasquez, Outstanding Lead Actor. For Vanita Harbour, Outstanding Supporting Actress. In 2018 – For Anne Marie Cummings, Outstanding Writer. For Mike E. Winfield, Outstanding Guest Actor.

The named actors cast in Seasons One and Two include Rebecca Metz (“Shameless,” “Better Things,” and “This is Us”), Sally Kirkland (Oscar nominee and Golden Globe Winner for the film “Anna”), Jack Plotnick (“Reno 911”), Vanita Harbour (“General Hospital”), Mike E. Winfield (“Brad Paisley’s Comedy Rodeo”), Alyssa Gabrielle Rodriguez (“Famous in Love” and “Silicon Valley”), Sterling Jones (“Lone Survivor”), and more. 

In Season Three, Justin Kirk, a Primetime Emmy-nominated, Golden Globe-nominated, Screen Actors Guild Award-nominated actor from award-winning TV series’ such as: “Weeds,” “APB,” “You’re the Worst,” “Modern Family,” “Wayward Pines,” “The Blacklist,” “Without a Trace,” and “Angels in America” starring opposite Meryl Streep, Al Pacino, and Emma Thompson, joined the cast. Another well-known actor in Season Three: Willie Garson. Garson has appeared in over 50 movies, but he is most known for his role of Stanford Blatch on the HBO series, “Sex and the City.”

From 2010-2015, Cummings was the Founder and Artistic Director of The Readers’ Theatre of Ithaca (RTI) which performed in black box theatres until it moved into a movie theatre where performance readings were held, as well Skype interview screenings with playwrights. Her directing credits with the company included: “Wrecks” and “Fat Pig” by Neil LaBute; “Detroit” by Lisa D’Amour; “Frozen” by Bryony Lavery; “Art” and “God of Carnage” by Yasmina Reza; “A Steady Rain” by Keith Huff; “No Child” by Nilaja Sun; “Oleanna” by David Mamet; “Uncle Vanya” by Anton Chekhov; “Collected Stories” by Donald Margulies; and “Burn This” by Lanford Wilson. With her company, Cummings also wrote, directed, and filmed RTI’s short film “Easy Prey,” an anti-bully film in collaboration with Pacer’s National Bullying Prevention Center and Cornell University.

A graduate of the competitive four-year conservatory drama program at Carnegie Mellon University (1996) and Oxford England’s British American Drama Academy summer program (1995), Cummings has worked, as an actress, with Tony-Award winning director Doug Hughes and other reputable directors such as Anne Bogart and Edward Payson Call. Bogart’s Viewpoints inspired Cummings towards the abstract perspective as a director developing her own avant-garde style. Cummings also studied at the British American Drama Academy under actors Jeremy Irons, Simon Callow, the late Sir John Gielgud, and the late Peggy Ashcroft. She has performed across the U.S. at the Seattle Repertory Theatre, The Intiman Theatre, The Alley Theatre, GeVa Theatre, Sacramento Theatre, Synchronicity Space in NYC, and The Cleveland Playhouse, to name a few.

 In 2005, Cummings’ play “India Awaiting” ran Off-Broadway at the Samuel Beckett Theatre (starring Maulik Pancholy from “30 Rock”). Her play “Extremes” was read at NYC’s Primary Stages and was included as part of their PrimeTime reading series (starring Michael Cullen, ‘Law and Order: Special Victims Unit’ and ‘Dead Man Walking’). Other plays include “Sinkhole,” “Soul Mates,” “Purgatory Row,” and “Touché!”.

Rounding out her experiences in the creative world, Cummings was an Art Producer for Serino Coyne Advertising in NYC, creating and developing art for Broadway advertising campaigns from “The Producers” to “Cabaret.”  She also worked as a Photo Editor for Paper Magazine in NYC, working under award-wining Designer and Creative Director Bridget de Socio. She was an Account Executive for LaForce & Stevens PR in NYC, launching the first Sephora in the U.S. while working with Yves Saint Laurent and The Body Shop.  She was also a columnist and journalist in Upstate New York, for almost a decade, covering news, food, life, teens, and alternative health. (www.annemariecummings.com).

GUSTAVO VELASQUEZ 

After Maria and Carlos fled El Salvador when they were 17, due to the guerrilla warfare in the country, they moved to Los Angeles individually. Not knowing how to speak English and not knowing anything about the American culture, the only thing they could do was hold onto a dream, a dream for a better life. The two met in Los Angeles, fell in love and over time became self-made and had four amazing children. One of them was the black sheep of the family who always went against the status quo: Gustavo Velasquez. 

Gustavo graduated cum-laude with a B.A. in Accounting from Cal State Fullerton. During his last year in college, he received job offers to join the audit teams at Pricewaterhouse Coopers and Ernst & Young, but he decided to take a huge risk for himself. Gustavo turned his back on the social norms of society and decided life was too short not to live fully as an artist. In other words - - to be happy every single day for the rest of his life. 

Directly following college, Gustavo attended multiple acting studios and workshops in Los Angeles, focusing all of his energy on honing his craft as an actor. He studied with Annie Grindlay, Margie Haber, Ani Avetyan, and Chick Venerra. He also took every workshop he could in the industry and researched everything there was to know about building a lasting career in Hollywood. Over the years, Gustavo has used his business background to help him build his acting career by writing and filming his own work, marketing, branding, honing his craft, failing constantly, and learning from his mistakes.

Gustavo eventually met Anne Marie Cummings, who gave him his first big break and cast him as one of the lead actors in “Conversations in L.A.” - a one-shot series which has received five Daytime Emmy nominations to date. In 2017, Gustavo received a Daytime Emmy nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Digital Drama series. For Season Three, Gustavo has taken on the additional role of Producer for “Conversations in L.A.” 

Gustavo believes happiness comes from being a well-rounded individual - - no amount of money, fame or success can give to you what knowing yourself can give. Being 100% physically, mentality and spiritually strong, treating others with kindness, and making the world a better place one day at a time, regardless of what the future brings, is part of his motto for life.


47 replies

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  • Melissa Melissa

    Gustavo, you got a degree in Accounting, was that your backup plan? Do you think every actor should have a backup plan?

    Gustavo, you got a degree in Accounting, was that your backup plan? Do you think every actor should have a backup plan?

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      Hey Melissa! 


      Yes. Graduated cum laude with my Accounting degree. Accounting was definitely my back up plan for a while.

      Now that I am fully invested as an actor. There is absolutely no back up plan. Acting is a full-time job. 24/7. 7 days a week. 365 days a year. 

      Actors should definitely not have a back up plan. BUT! They should diversify themselves and have multiple revenue streams. Such as. You are an Actors. You are your own business. You are an entrepreneur essentially.

      As an Actor. You can do commercials, one revenue stream. You can do theatrical, second revenue stream. You should also be producing your own work, third revenue stream. You should have a stable, flexible night job, fourth revenue stream. And so on. I am also an investor. My business background has truly helped me create multiple revenue streams that allow me to be flexible and devote all my time to acting. 

      The long-term goal is to be a working actor. only 1% of actors get to realize this dream. In order to get their, you will have to treat your artistry as a business. You can't wait to become a working actor to start living your life either. You should start creating multiple revenue streams and live your life now. The worst feeling in the world for an actor, is to wait around for the phone to ring. You can be waiting for years and that call may never come. You need to get out there and start thinking outside the box. 

      The plan should be to become a successful working actor and diversity my talents as much as possible. 

      Hey Melissa! 


      Yes. Graduated cum laude with my Accounting degree. Accounting was definitely my back up plan for a while.

      Now that I am fully invested as an actor. There is absolutely no back up plan. Acting is a full-time job. 24/7. 7 days a week. 365 days a year. 

      Actors should definitely not have a back up plan. BUT! They should diversify themselves and have multiple revenue streams. Such as. You are an Actors. You are your own business. You are an entrepreneur essentially.

      As an Actor. You can do commercials, one revenue stream. You can do theatrical, second revenue stream. You should also be producing your own work, third revenue stream. You should have a stable, flexible night job, fourth revenue stream. And so on. I am also an investor. My business background has truly helped me create multiple revenue streams that allow me to be flexible and devote all my time to acting. 

      The long-term goal is to be a working actor. only 1% of actors get to realize this dream. In order to get their, you will have to treat your artistry as a business. You can't wait to become a working actor to start living your life either. You should start creating multiple revenue streams and live your life now. The worst feeling in the world for an actor, is to wait around for the phone to ring. You can be waiting for years and that call may never come. You need to get out there and start thinking outside the box. 

      The plan should be to become a successful working actor and diversity my talents as much as possible. 

  • Chelsea LaLa
    1y ago

    Gustavo I read you are an adrenaline junkie, what sport have you not done that you want to get into?

    Gustavo I read you are an adrenaline junkie, what sport have you not done that you want to get into?

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      Hello Chelsea! 


      Yes. I absolutely love extreme sports. I make a goal to go surfing and mountain biking every week. I love snowboarding and in-door rock climbing as well. I love grabbing my short board and cruising the beach whenever I can.

      I would love to wake board, take a formula 1 kart driving class and learn motor cross. 

      Jumps and speed! Sign me up! 


      Hello Chelsea! 


      Yes. I absolutely love extreme sports. I make a goal to go surfing and mountain biking every week. I love snowboarding and in-door rock climbing as well. I love grabbing my short board and cruising the beach whenever I can.

      I would love to wake board, take a formula 1 kart driving class and learn motor cross. 

      Jumps and speed! Sign me up! 


  • Chelsea LaLa
    1y ago

    Anne Marie as the writer of Conversations in LA, you have the unique opportunity to cast your love interests. Whom would you like act opposite with next?

    Anne Marie as the writer of Conversations in LA, you have the unique opportunity to cast your love interests. Whom would you like act opposite with next?

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Oh gosh - I don't know! I love Matthias Schoenaerts as of late, and I've always admired Aaron Eckhart. But I'm not one who needs to work with stars - - just real talent!

      Oh gosh - I don't know! I love Matthias Schoenaerts as of late, and I've always admired Aaron Eckhart. But I'm not one who needs to work with stars - - just real talent!

  • Chelsea LaLa
    1y ago

    Anne Marie your artwork is amazing. How did you learn to draw?

    Anne Marie your artwork is amazing. How did you learn to draw?

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hello Chelsea LaLa! 


      I learned how to draw when I was very young from my babysitter. She was blind in one eye of all things! She taught me how to draw eyes, lips, noses, all with a pencil and eraser! From there I bought different shades of black and gray and began to draw on my own - faces, people, still life's. Thank you for enjoying my artwork! There is something magical about creating life on a page - drawing or writing! 

      Hello Chelsea LaLa! 


      I learned how to draw when I was very young from my babysitter. She was blind in one eye of all things! She taught me how to draw eyes, lips, noses, all with a pencil and eraser! From there I bought different shades of black and gray and began to draw on my own - faces, people, still life's. Thank you for enjoying my artwork! There is something magical about creating life on a page - drawing or writing! 

  • Alexis The Bestest

    Gustavo- your parents Maria and Carlos fled El Salvador when they were 17, what do you feel about what the government is doing to DACA recipients and the dreamers?

    Gustavo- your parents Maria and Carlos fled El Salvador when they were 17, what do you feel about what the government is doing to DACA recipients and the dreamers?

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      I am beyond grateful that the U.S. Government allowed my parents to come to the U.S. when they were fearful for their lives. A true blessing. The current situation with DACA recipients and dreamers is heart breaking. My heart goes out to everyone fighting for a better life. Everyone deserves an opportunity to live a better life. 

      I am beyond grateful that the U.S. Government allowed my parents to come to the U.S. when they were fearful for their lives. A true blessing. The current situation with DACA recipients and dreamers is heart breaking. My heart goes out to everyone fighting for a better life. Everyone deserves an opportunity to live a better life. 

  • Alexis The Bestest

    Gustavo why were you considered the black sheep of your family?

    Gustavo why were you considered the black sheep of your family?

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      Hey Alexis! 


      As a child I was changing my profession to be every month. I would want to be a professional skater for a few months. Then I would start writing rap lyrics and want to be a rapper. Then I would want to be a boxer, formula one racer and even a Lawyer. The list was endless. And when I decided what I wanted to be, I fully explored it until I got bored and moved on. I was also very passionate about my opinions. I started selling real estate at 18 and at the same time would be acting in commercials. My family never knew what I would do next, but they were never surprised. 

      Hey Alexis! 


      As a child I was changing my profession to be every month. I would want to be a professional skater for a few months. Then I would start writing rap lyrics and want to be a rapper. Then I would want to be a boxer, formula one racer and even a Lawyer. The list was endless. And when I decided what I wanted to be, I fully explored it until I got bored and moved on. I was also very passionate about my opinions. I started selling real estate at 18 and at the same time would be acting in commercials. My family never knew what I would do next, but they were never surprised. 

  • Jessica Daniel

    Any chance we will soon see "Conversations in Brooklyn?" LOL?

    Any chance we will soon see "Conversations in Brooklyn?" LOL?

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hi Jessica Daniel! That is a great question and you may very well see that! I have applied for the trademark to write conversations in different cities around the United States and the world! I'm only a few months away from all this! 

      Hi Jessica Daniel! That is a great question and you may very well see that! I have applied for the trademark to write conversations in different cities around the United States and the world! I'm only a few months away from all this! 

  • Sparkle Saint James

    In Conversations with LA, the man character Michelle Macabee is dating a guy 22 years younger and it's a huge deal. Why do you think our society frowns upon women dating younger men but makes no issue when someone like Harrison Ford marries Calista Flockhart who is 22 younger than him?

    In Conversations with LA, the man character Michelle Macabee is dating a guy 22 years younger and it's a huge deal. Why do you think our society frowns upon women dating younger men but makes no issue when someone like Harrison Ford marries Calista Flockhart who is 22 younger than him?

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hello again!


      Great questions! 

      I honestly don't know why our society frowns on the older woman/younger man relationship. Because it's not the norm? Whenever anything is not what everyone else does, instead of saying - hey, why not? People tend to make fun, be scared, shy away, gossip about, criticize. 

      This is why writing about this kind of relationship makes for great drama - partly - because it's not the norm. I think it's becoming more the norm today, but it's still seen as - well, it must be about sex if it's an older woman and a younger man. 

      Society sets standards and individuals often create new roads so society has established that an older man and a younger woman is "the way to go" - what's considered "normal." But do you remember how many people talked and gossiped about Demi Moore when she was married to Ashton Kutcher? 

      At the end of the day it's about love and a soul connection. Many people fall in love because the person next to them makes them look good. Many people fall in love because of how much money their partner has. Many people fall in love because of the person's place in society. I think it's rare to fall in love and pursue love for love's sake - because you really do care about someone and you bring out the best in them and they bring out the best in you. This is what Gus and Michelle are about - despite the obstacles and I think what "Conversations in L.A." shows is a relationship that's like any other, despite the age difference. 

      Hello again!


      Great questions! 

      I honestly don't know why our society frowns on the older woman/younger man relationship. Because it's not the norm? Whenever anything is not what everyone else does, instead of saying - hey, why not? People tend to make fun, be scared, shy away, gossip about, criticize. 

      This is why writing about this kind of relationship makes for great drama - partly - because it's not the norm. I think it's becoming more the norm today, but it's still seen as - well, it must be about sex if it's an older woman and a younger man. 

      Society sets standards and individuals often create new roads so society has established that an older man and a younger woman is "the way to go" - what's considered "normal." But do you remember how many people talked and gossiped about Demi Moore when she was married to Ashton Kutcher? 

      At the end of the day it's about love and a soul connection. Many people fall in love because the person next to them makes them look good. Many people fall in love because of how much money their partner has. Many people fall in love because of the person's place in society. I think it's rare to fall in love and pursue love for love's sake - because you really do care about someone and you bring out the best in them and they bring out the best in you. This is what Gus and Michelle are about - despite the obstacles and I think what "Conversations in L.A." shows is a relationship that's like any other, despite the age difference. 

  • Sparkle Saint James

    I am a huge fan of "Conversations in LA." How did you come up with the concept of the show and the cute slogan "Millennial Meets Menopausal?"

    I am a huge fan of "Conversations in LA." How did you come up with the concept of the show and the cute slogan "Millennial Meets Menopausal?"

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hi! The concept stemmed from a play that I was writing - actually a series of conversations called "Conversations." From there I expanded and turned one scene about two people sitting in a veterinarian office, about to euthanize their pets, into a story about Gus and Michelle, standing on the Expo Train subway platform in Los Angeles. 


      "Millennial Meets Menopausal" was actually a subtitle that was an idea from Seasons One and Two casting directors Brett Banner and Debby Romano! They mentioned it and I loved it! 

      Hi! The concept stemmed from a play that I was writing - actually a series of conversations called "Conversations." From there I expanded and turned one scene about two people sitting in a veterinarian office, about to euthanize their pets, into a story about Gus and Michelle, standing on the Expo Train subway platform in Los Angeles. 


      "Millennial Meets Menopausal" was actually a subtitle that was an idea from Seasons One and Two casting directors Brett Banner and Debby Romano! They mentioned it and I loved it! 

  • Sparkle Saint James

    You have done so much in your career thus far from acting and producing to writing and creating amazing artwork. What accomplishment in your career are you most proud of thus far?

    You have done so much in your career thus far from acting and producing to writing and creating amazing artwork. What accomplishment in your career are you most proud of thus far?

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hello Sparkle Saint James! I love your questions!


      The accomplishments in my career that I am most proud of - so far...well, I don't think that I look at the projects in my past with one being greater than another. Every single thing I've ever done has taught me something and has built me up to be the artist I am today. In my mind, one project isn't necessarily better than another - just because the ones in the past haven't been recognized on a larger scale doesn't mean they weren't a big success. 

      What I'm most proud of is the fact that I haven't stopped being an artist and that all this time I've stayed true to myself and my calling as a woman. This is very difficult to do - really - especially in a world that often tries to convince you to be someone you aren't - to follow the crowd so to speak. 

      Hello Sparkle Saint James! I love your questions!


      The accomplishments in my career that I am most proud of - so far...well, I don't think that I look at the projects in my past with one being greater than another. Every single thing I've ever done has taught me something and has built me up to be the artist I am today. In my mind, one project isn't necessarily better than another - just because the ones in the past haven't been recognized on a larger scale doesn't mean they weren't a big success. 

      What I'm most proud of is the fact that I haven't stopped being an artist and that all this time I've stayed true to myself and my calling as a woman. This is very difficult to do - really - especially in a world that often tries to convince you to be someone you aren't - to follow the crowd so to speak. 

  • Danica
    1y ago

    Conversations in LA was nominated for 5 EMMYs. Where were you when you first learned the news and what were your thoughts?

    Conversations in LA was nominated for 5 EMMYs. Where were you when you first learned the news and what were your thoughts?

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Thanks Danica! 


      All these times I was at home - writing of course! My initial thoughts were shock and then gratitude and then a sense of stepping back and seeing that my efforts are being recognized. I'm 50 years old and I've been at this for a long time, but in my own way. I have concentrated as an actress, then a playwright, then an artistic director and director and when I moved to Los Angeles three years ago, I knew that I was about to embark on a journey that brings all those talents of mine together  - as a showrunner, so at the end of the day, I'm very happy to have received recognition for my work. Most importantly, as a writer because I plan on writing more - for as long as I can. I have a lot of important and moving stories to tell! 

      Thanks Danica! 


      All these times I was at home - writing of course! My initial thoughts were shock and then gratitude and then a sense of stepping back and seeing that my efforts are being recognized. I'm 50 years old and I've been at this for a long time, but in my own way. I have concentrated as an actress, then a playwright, then an artistic director and director and when I moved to Los Angeles three years ago, I knew that I was about to embark on a journey that brings all those talents of mine together  - as a showrunner, so at the end of the day, I'm very happy to have received recognition for my work. Most importantly, as a writer because I plan on writing more - for as long as I can. I have a lot of important and moving stories to tell! 

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      Hey Danica!


      I was driving when Anne Marie messaged me the Daytime Emmys results. I pulled over and took a deep breathe. When I found out we were both nominated for Best Leads for a digital drama in 2017 I was beyond speechless. In 2018 Anne Marie and I were doing production work when we read the results online. Recently, for Anne Marie to received a writing nomination as well as the nominations for our supporting actors has been a dream. The 5 Daytime Emmys are a tribute to all of Anne Maries incredible creativity and work ethic. She is an absolute powerful house! A true MOGUL! The next huge show runner in Hollywood! 

      Hey Danica!


      I was driving when Anne Marie messaged me the Daytime Emmys results. I pulled over and took a deep breathe. When I found out we were both nominated for Best Leads for a digital drama in 2017 I was beyond speechless. In 2018 Anne Marie and I were doing production work when we read the results online. Recently, for Anne Marie to received a writing nomination as well as the nominations for our supporting actors has been a dream. The 5 Daytime Emmys are a tribute to all of Anne Maries incredible creativity and work ethic. She is an absolute powerful house! A true MOGUL! The next huge show runner in Hollywood! 

  • Danica
    1y ago

    What other female playwrights or screenwriters do you admire and why?

    What other female playwrights or screenwriters do you admire and why?

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hey Danica! Hope you're doing well!


      Some of my favorite female playwrights are Caryl Churchill because she is constantly reinventing the wheel - check out "Love and Information," and I also like Rebecca Gilman, specifically "Boy Gets Girl" and "Spinning Into Butter." But honestly, the best playwrights to me are the ones where I don't think about what sex they are. I am always impressed when a woman can write male roles with so much depth and when a man can write female roles with the same understanding as his own sex. Those are the kinds of playwrights and writers, in general, that inspire me the most. I think Neil LaBute writes female roles in such a way that you would believe they had to be written by a woman. I think Tennessee Williams is also the exact same way. 

      At the end of the day, I don't care who wrote a piece - what matters to me the most is if it moved me and what it had to say. I remember certain stories for their performances, but great performances stem from - I believe - great writing. And great writing, in my opinion, needs to be layered writing - three dimensional, at best. Great writing is about showing us all sides of a character. An actor alone cannot do this and neither can a director. I find it interesting that playwrights seem to receive more acclaim than screenwriters. I think playwrights have earned a reputation for writing meaningful work - work that really has something to say - because it should if they only have two hours or 90 minutes to say it. For film and television, there's more time to say what needs to be said, so I think some screenwriters might get lazy. But you know when something is strong by the way it makes you feel when you watch it! 

      Hey Danica! Hope you're doing well!


      Some of my favorite female playwrights are Caryl Churchill because she is constantly reinventing the wheel - check out "Love and Information," and I also like Rebecca Gilman, specifically "Boy Gets Girl" and "Spinning Into Butter." But honestly, the best playwrights to me are the ones where I don't think about what sex they are. I am always impressed when a woman can write male roles with so much depth and when a man can write female roles with the same understanding as his own sex. Those are the kinds of playwrights and writers, in general, that inspire me the most. I think Neil LaBute writes female roles in such a way that you would believe they had to be written by a woman. I think Tennessee Williams is also the exact same way. 

      At the end of the day, I don't care who wrote a piece - what matters to me the most is if it moved me and what it had to say. I remember certain stories for their performances, but great performances stem from - I believe - great writing. And great writing, in my opinion, needs to be layered writing - three dimensional, at best. Great writing is about showing us all sides of a character. An actor alone cannot do this and neither can a director. I find it interesting that playwrights seem to receive more acclaim than screenwriters. I think playwrights have earned a reputation for writing meaningful work - work that really has something to say - because it should if they only have two hours or 90 minutes to say it. For film and television, there's more time to say what needs to be said, so I think some screenwriters might get lazy. But you know when something is strong by the way it makes you feel when you watch it! 

  • Taylor Willimon

    If you have an idea for a series, what's the process of pitching it and getting it made? How do you find funding? 

    If you have an idea for a series, what's the process of pitching it and getting it made? How do you find funding? 

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hi Taylor! Great questions! I believe the most important thing to do is first have a great idea and make sure it's your idea and very unique. People can tell the same story, but in different ways, so start with you and an idea that excites you. You will have to live with that idea, that story, those characters, for a long time so make sure it drives you! Then get to know what's out there and how artists are telling those stories. What will make yours different? For example, for my series, "Conversations in L.A." I focused on a story I wanted to write, what I wanted to say about it, and then how I wanted it to be filmed. I come from an extensive theatre background so what I did was very organic - move theatre onto film - merge the two - with a one-shot series. Maybe you have an idea for how a story is filmed? There are a gazillion and one ways out there! 


      In terms of pitching and getting it made. The good news is that today there are many many platforms for streaming. Get to know those platforms and decide which ones you want to be on and approach them. Yes, it is as simple as contacting them with an email, I believe. Some platforms are harder to reach, so find a team that can help you. Teamwork makes the dreamwork! 

      And about funding? Sometimes the money comes from yourself, at first. Sometimes the money comes from friends. Sometimes the money will come from a stranger who believes in you - and eventually the money comes in from producers and teams of people who invest in projects like yours! 

      Hi Taylor! Great questions! I believe the most important thing to do is first have a great idea and make sure it's your idea and very unique. People can tell the same story, but in different ways, so start with you and an idea that excites you. You will have to live with that idea, that story, those characters, for a long time so make sure it drives you! Then get to know what's out there and how artists are telling those stories. What will make yours different? For example, for my series, "Conversations in L.A." I focused on a story I wanted to write, what I wanted to say about it, and then how I wanted it to be filmed. I come from an extensive theatre background so what I did was very organic - move theatre onto film - merge the two - with a one-shot series. Maybe you have an idea for how a story is filmed? There are a gazillion and one ways out there! 


      In terms of pitching and getting it made. The good news is that today there are many many platforms for streaming. Get to know those platforms and decide which ones you want to be on and approach them. Yes, it is as simple as contacting them with an email, I believe. Some platforms are harder to reach, so find a team that can help you. Teamwork makes the dreamwork! 

      And about funding? Sometimes the money comes from yourself, at first. Sometimes the money comes from friends. Sometimes the money will come from a stranger who believes in you - and eventually the money comes in from producers and teams of people who invest in projects like yours! 

  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    1y ago New York, NY, United States

    Did you have an agent throughout your career? Or were there times where you got work by yourself? 

    Did you have an agent throughout your career? Or were there times where you got work by yourself? 

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      Hey Bethany!


      I started on my own in this industry. Eventually I met different managers and agents. Some good, some not good. Its all a learning experience. 

      Currently i have an amazing theatrical manager and commercial agent. 

      When It comes to managers/agents. All the matters is, that they 100% believe in you. The size of the office is not important at all. All that matters is, are they willing to fight for you and believe in you! 

      Hey Bethany!


      I started on my own in this industry. Eventually I met different managers and agents. Some good, some not good. Its all a learning experience. 

      Currently i have an amazing theatrical manager and commercial agent. 

      When It comes to managers/agents. All the matters is, that they 100% believe in you. The size of the office is not important at all. All that matters is, are they willing to fight for you and believe in you! 

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      1y ago

      Hi Bethany! This is a great question. I had an agent when I was first starting out and my focus was solely on acting. But my path has been so varied - so experimental - that I've gone most of my life without an agent and/or manager. The reason for this is because even when I had an agent, I tended to seek out and get my own work. I think many artists rely on an agent and a manager, which is necessary at times, but it certainly doesn't HAVE to be this way. As a creator of content, I'm always creating and today, given so many platforms and ways to stream, one can have an agent or one can create their own connections. I have a very different view about this than most, but I think it's what keeps me on my toes. All this being said, now is a time in my life and career where I'm interested in getting an agent and manager, but not just any. I'm patient enough right now to wait for what I feel I deserve - and that's representation at the top! 


      Hi Bethany! This is a great question. I had an agent when I was first starting out and my focus was solely on acting. But my path has been so varied - so experimental - that I've gone most of my life without an agent and/or manager. The reason for this is because even when I had an agent, I tended to seek out and get my own work. I think many artists rely on an agent and a manager, which is necessary at times, but it certainly doesn't HAVE to be this way. As a creator of content, I'm always creating and today, given so many platforms and ways to stream, one can have an agent or one can create their own connections. I have a very different view about this than most, but I think it's what keeps me on my toes. All this being said, now is a time in my life and career where I'm interested in getting an agent and manager, but not just any. I'm patient enough right now to wait for what I feel I deserve - and that's representation at the top! 


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  • Sierra Wingert
    1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

    Hi! I'm graduating this May with a Theatre-Performance degree from SDSU. I will be moving to LA, when my lease ends in San Diego, at the end of this summer to pursue a career in Film/Television. What pieces of advice could you give to someone like me, who is about to make a transition into the professional world? What do you attribute your success to? What is your definition of success? And lastly, what steps should I take to prepare myself for success in the industry? 

    Hi! I'm graduating this May with a Theatre-Performance degree from SDSU. I will be moving to LA, when my lease ends in San Diego, at the end of this summer to pursue a career in Film/Television. What pieces of advice could you give to someone like me, who is about to make a transition into the professional world? What do you attribute your success to? What is your definition of success? And lastly, what steps should I take to prepare myself for success in the industry? 

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      Hey Sierra. My best advice for someone new to the industry is, understand this is going to be a journey. I have seen so many people come and go from my early days because they never had a long-term plan. You need to treat this like a business. You as an actress, are an entrepreneur. You are managing your own business. Find a steady job at night that will give you financial stability and allow you to audition during the day. The best jobs are server/bartender.  Most actors who come to LA serve tables or bartend for this very reason. Acting classes, headshots, workshops, clothes, gas, food and everything adds up very quickly. The more stable you are financially the less stressed you will be when auditioning and chasing this long-term dream. SAVE all your money! Be frugal! Invest in your business. Take multiple acting classes. I highly suggest Annie Grindlay studio and Ani Avetyan and Connect Studios. These are teachers who really care about their students and are not looking to just get a paycheck. There are no rules in this industry, everyones path is different. You will fail, you will feels like giving up, you will cry, but NEVER GIVE UP!! If you really want this dream to come true, you have to persevere when everyone else thinks its impossible. This is going to be a beautiful marathon! So find financially stability first! Free your mornings up. FOCUS everything on your CRAFT!! This town is the meca for artists from all over the world, all chasing the dream. Your talent will have to be undeniable. So never stop working on your craft. With  financially stable job, flexibility and a passion for the craft you will be off to a HUGE start in this industry. I wish someone would have told me this when i started. Good Luck! I wish you all the best!! It will all be worth it! NEVER GIVE UP! 

      Hey Sierra. My best advice for someone new to the industry is, understand this is going to be a journey. I have seen so many people come and go from my early days because they never had a long-term plan. You need to treat this like a business. You as an actress, are an entrepreneur. You are managing your own business. Find a steady job at night that will give you financial stability and allow you to audition during the day. The best jobs are server/bartender.  Most actors who come to LA serve tables or bartend for this very reason. Acting classes, headshots, workshops, clothes, gas, food and everything adds up very quickly. The more stable you are financially the less stressed you will be when auditioning and chasing this long-term dream. SAVE all your money! Be frugal! Invest in your business. Take multiple acting classes. I highly suggest Annie Grindlay studio and Ani Avetyan and Connect Studios. These are teachers who really care about their students and are not looking to just get a paycheck. There are no rules in this industry, everyones path is different. You will fail, you will feels like giving up, you will cry, but NEVER GIVE UP!! If you really want this dream to come true, you have to persevere when everyone else thinks its impossible. This is going to be a beautiful marathon! So find financially stability first! Free your mornings up. FOCUS everything on your CRAFT!! This town is the meca for artists from all over the world, all chasing the dream. Your talent will have to be undeniable. So never stop working on your craft. With  financially stable job, flexibility and a passion for the craft you will be off to a HUGE start in this industry. I wish someone would have told me this when i started. Good Luck! I wish you all the best!! It will all be worth it! NEVER GIVE UP! 

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hello Sierra! Thank you for your amazing questions! Glad to learn you're pursuing a career in film/television. My best advice to give is don't compare your journey to anyone else's. What you have to say and do as a filmmaker and artist is unique to you and that's what you need to remember. My definition of success is being true to yourself - and that means across the board - as an artist in every way, as a person - always working towards bettering yourself and being the best you can be. Most especially not being afraid to learn and take risks. Steps to take to prepare yourself for the industry? Stay open - you never know what might happen. Say 'yes' to any project that excites you! 

      Hello Sierra! Thank you for your amazing questions! Glad to learn you're pursuing a career in film/television. My best advice to give is don't compare your journey to anyone else's. What you have to say and do as a filmmaker and artist is unique to you and that's what you need to remember. My definition of success is being true to yourself - and that means across the board - as an artist in every way, as a person - always working towards bettering yourself and being the best you can be. Most especially not being afraid to learn and take risks. Steps to take to prepare yourself for the industry? Stay open - you never know what might happen. Say 'yes' to any project that excites you! 

  • Sierra Wingert
    1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

    Hi! I'm graduating this May with a Theatre-Performance degree from SDSU. I will be moving to LA, when my lease ends in San Diego, at the end of this summer to pursue a career in Film/Television. What pieces of advice could you give to someone like me, who is about to make a transition into the professional world? What do you attribute your success to? What is your definition of success? And lastly, what steps should I take to prepare myself for success in the industry? 

    Hi! I'm graduating this May with a Theatre-Performance degree from SDSU. I will be moving to LA, when my lease ends in San Diego, at the end of this summer to pursue a career in Film/Television. What pieces of advice could you give to someone like me, who is about to make a transition into the professional world? What do you attribute your success to? What is your definition of success? And lastly, what steps should I take to prepare myself for success in the industry? 

  • MTFan93
    1y ago Cornell University, Broad St, New York, NY, USA

    Hello, where can I watch the series? 

    Hello, where can I watch the series? 

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hey MTFan93! You can watch Season One on Amazon Prime and iTunes and you can watch Season Two on Amazon Prime (this May) on Amazon Prime and iTunes (it's up on iTunes now). You can also rent Seasons One and Two, and learn more about the ONE-SHOT series on www.conversationsinla.com. Enjoy and thank you for your interest!

      Hey MTFan93! You can watch Season One on Amazon Prime and iTunes and you can watch Season Two on Amazon Prime (this May) on Amazon Prime and iTunes (it's up on iTunes now). You can also rent Seasons One and Two, and learn more about the ONE-SHOT series on www.conversationsinla.com. Enjoy and thank you for your interest!

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      Season one can be found on Amazon Prime and iTunes.

      Season two will be on Amazon Prime in a few weeks and is already on iTunes.
      For behind the scenes and more about the series you can visit Conversationsinla.com 

      Season three coming soon!!

      Season one can be found on Amazon Prime and iTunes.

      Season two will be on Amazon Prime in a few weeks and is already on iTunes.
      For behind the scenes and more about the series you can visit Conversationsinla.com 

      Season three coming soon!!

  • WallFlower
    1y ago

    Where did you all study? or did you study acting? who are your favorite actors?

    Where did you all study? or did you study acting? who are your favorite actors?

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hello WallFlower! Thanks for the great questions! I studied acting at Carnegie Mellon University. I attended the four-year drama program - focusing on acting, specifically. I also studied at the British American Drama Academy in Oxford, England. And furthermore, I attended summer theatre programs at Northwestern University in Chicago and in Minneapolis, the Minneapolis Children's Theatre. 


      My formal education, early on, was at schools - as you can see; however, I think of life as a place of study. I have been told by many that I am an autodidact - a self-taught individual. I think this is very true because what I have done, almost my entire life, is create opportunities for myself to explore and experiment, artistically, and through those experiences, no matter how great or small, I am teaching myself and learning. 

      Education is very important! But one of my favorite quotes by Albert Einstein is: "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think!" This is how I see it - and after all the education I've had. That my job, as a visionary/creator/writer - is to think, to use my brain and come up with something to say.

      My favorite actors? Ah, where do I begin with this one! I certainly have my favorites and for different reasons. So I'll begin...Al Pacino for his fire! Justin Kirk for his freeness! Matthias Schoenaerts for his vigor, power, and sexiness! Jeremy Irons and Daniel Day Lewis for their details and intensity. Charlize Theron for her risk taking and believability AND not being afraid to look "ugly" on screen (it is about the characters after all - not the barbie doll depiction Hollywood likes to have of women). Marion Cotillard for her courage on screen. Michael Fassbender for not being afraid to be the villain. Aaron Eckhart for being real - same with Ed Harris! Tom Cruise for knowing what he excels at and taking that to the enth degree. Denzel Washington for choosing important roles with well-written scripts. Leonardo DiCaprio for going all the way, ever single time he's in something - his commitment is admirable. Carey Milligan for being genuine. The list is endless with modern actors. And then there are the old time actors like Audrey Hepburn, Cary Grant, Gregory Peck, Humphrey Bogart, Grace Kelly, and Vivian Leigh. 

      Hello WallFlower! Thanks for the great questions! I studied acting at Carnegie Mellon University. I attended the four-year drama program - focusing on acting, specifically. I also studied at the British American Drama Academy in Oxford, England. And furthermore, I attended summer theatre programs at Northwestern University in Chicago and in Minneapolis, the Minneapolis Children's Theatre. 


      My formal education, early on, was at schools - as you can see; however, I think of life as a place of study. I have been told by many that I am an autodidact - a self-taught individual. I think this is very true because what I have done, almost my entire life, is create opportunities for myself to explore and experiment, artistically, and through those experiences, no matter how great or small, I am teaching myself and learning. 

      Education is very important! But one of my favorite quotes by Albert Einstein is: "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think!" This is how I see it - and after all the education I've had. That my job, as a visionary/creator/writer - is to think, to use my brain and come up with something to say.

      My favorite actors? Ah, where do I begin with this one! I certainly have my favorites and for different reasons. So I'll begin...Al Pacino for his fire! Justin Kirk for his freeness! Matthias Schoenaerts for his vigor, power, and sexiness! Jeremy Irons and Daniel Day Lewis for their details and intensity. Charlize Theron for her risk taking and believability AND not being afraid to look "ugly" on screen (it is about the characters after all - not the barbie doll depiction Hollywood likes to have of women). Marion Cotillard for her courage on screen. Michael Fassbender for not being afraid to be the villain. Aaron Eckhart for being real - same with Ed Harris! Tom Cruise for knowing what he excels at and taking that to the enth degree. Denzel Washington for choosing important roles with well-written scripts. Leonardo DiCaprio for going all the way, ever single time he's in something - his commitment is admirable. Carey Milligan for being genuine. The list is endless with modern actors. And then there are the old time actors like Audrey Hepburn, Cary Grant, Gregory Peck, Humphrey Bogart, Grace Kelly, and Vivian Leigh. 

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      Hello WallFlower!


      My journey began at The Renegade Theatre and Film Group taught by Chick Vennera. I went on to study at Annie Grindlay Studio, Margie Haber Studio and UCB, Groundlings. I have also studied with countless casting directors such as Ani Avetyan and Scott David. I have taken numerous casting director workshops throughout the years. 

      What I have found about classes, is that their is no one teacher who will teach you everything. You will find different techniques from each teacher. Train with multiple teachers to find what works for YOU. The craft, is a journey. Continue to learn and grow your craft. 

      I loved Annie Grindlay and Margie Haber because they teach on camera audition style. They give you a script ahead of time, then they put you on tape. They help break down the script and review your tape each class. You really get a foundation about the process of breaking down a script. Knowing how to break down a script is one of the best skills you can have as an actor. 

      I loved Chick Vennera, because he taught on camera for the first part of class then we performed theatre scenes for the second part of class. The on camera portion taught me about working with a camera. The theatre portion really helped me dive into the character. The combination was a beautiful experience. 

      Studying with casting directors is also a fantastic idea since they are constantly casting roles and know why actors stand out in the audition phase. I highly recommend Ani Avetyan at connect studios in Burbank. 

      Lastly, the best class of all for me has been working with Anne Marie. She is an absolute powerhouse talent. Her writing, direction and acting are phenomenal. She pushes every actor to bring out the best performance possible. 

      LEARN LEARN LEARN!!! THE CRAFT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF ACTING! 
      ALSO TREAT IT LIKE A BUSINESS.

      Hello WallFlower!


      My journey began at The Renegade Theatre and Film Group taught by Chick Vennera. I went on to study at Annie Grindlay Studio, Margie Haber Studio and UCB, Groundlings. I have also studied with countless casting directors such as Ani Avetyan and Scott David. I have taken numerous casting director workshops throughout the years. 

      What I have found about classes, is that their is no one teacher who will teach you everything. You will find different techniques from each teacher. Train with multiple teachers to find what works for YOU. The craft, is a journey. Continue to learn and grow your craft. 

      I loved Annie Grindlay and Margie Haber because they teach on camera audition style. They give you a script ahead of time, then they put you on tape. They help break down the script and review your tape each class. You really get a foundation about the process of breaking down a script. Knowing how to break down a script is one of the best skills you can have as an actor. 

      I loved Chick Vennera, because he taught on camera for the first part of class then we performed theatre scenes for the second part of class. The on camera portion taught me about working with a camera. The theatre portion really helped me dive into the character. The combination was a beautiful experience. 

      Studying with casting directors is also a fantastic idea since they are constantly casting roles and know why actors stand out in the audition phase. I highly recommend Ani Avetyan at connect studios in Burbank. 

      Lastly, the best class of all for me has been working with Anne Marie. She is an absolute powerhouse talent. Her writing, direction and acting are phenomenal. She pushes every actor to bring out the best performance possible. 

      LEARN LEARN LEARN!!! THE CRAFT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF ACTING! 
      ALSO TREAT IT LIKE A BUSINESS.

  • Leah 94
    1y ago

    how do you write a screenplay? do you have a recommended book to read to learn?

    how do you write a screenplay? do you have a recommended book to read to learn?

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hello Leah! Thank you for your questions! How to write a screenplay? I could give you the traditional answer, but I don't know how much that will help you. I think the best thing I can say to you is about writing a screenplay, or anything for that matter is - what do you think about? What kinds of conversations do you have with your friends? What ignites you? When you watch the news - what are you drawn to? When you read a book - what kind of book is it? What stories do you like and why? Start with YOURSELF. Get to know YOURSELF, because as a writer - someone who wants to write - it all begins with you. And there's no rush to this either and there's no right or wrong. 


      In terms of books to read? What artist do you like? And that means - whether they are a director, actor, writer, producer. Start there. See what they have to say. When I was 16 years old, I was really into the films by Ingmar Bergman. So I went to the bookstore and bought all the books I could find about Ingmar Bergman, the writer and director. I didn't have to have a "why" - I just had to follow my passion. So follow your passion and find yourself! 

      Hello Leah! Thank you for your questions! How to write a screenplay? I could give you the traditional answer, but I don't know how much that will help you. I think the best thing I can say to you is about writing a screenplay, or anything for that matter is - what do you think about? What kinds of conversations do you have with your friends? What ignites you? When you watch the news - what are you drawn to? When you read a book - what kind of book is it? What stories do you like and why? Start with YOURSELF. Get to know YOURSELF, because as a writer - someone who wants to write - it all begins with you. And there's no rush to this either and there's no right or wrong. 


      In terms of books to read? What artist do you like? And that means - whether they are a director, actor, writer, producer. Start there. See what they have to say. When I was 16 years old, I was really into the films by Ingmar Bergman. So I went to the bookstore and bought all the books I could find about Ingmar Bergman, the writer and director. I didn't have to have a "why" - I just had to follow my passion. So follow your passion and find yourself! 

  • Sarah Fein
    1y ago

    What is the process of turning a creative idea like a series into a reality? Where do you begin? I applaud you all for your work. 

    What is the process of turning a creative idea like a series into a reality? Where do you begin? I applaud you all for your work. 

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Thank you Sarah - for appreciating my series and all the hard work that we all put into it! 


      To answer your question...the process can be anything that gets you to your end result. I can tell you how I created "Conversations in L.A." - which is probably not the atypical process for anyone creating a show. 

      "Conversations in L.A." began for me as a play that was called "Conversations." The story was with a man and a woman who were meeting at a veterinarian office, the lobby. They were both about to euthanize their pets. I worked on that for a while and then put it away. A year later, when I moved to Los Angeles, I decided to pick that material up again  - because I needed material (as an actress) for a film/television reel. Interestingly enough, I changed the names of my characters, I altered the story - radically - and from one scene, I wrote another, and another, and then kept going. Why did I do this? Because I needed to. Those characters NEEDED to talk to each other. I began to find a flow from this dialogue they, and then other characters, started to have. 

      Once I realized I had a series - season one - I just kept going. I built a website for my series, submitted to the Daytime Emmy's - submitted to other festivals, and got my work out there the best I could. 

      Now I continue to do that with higher aspirations and bigger goals. The idea is to keep creating goals for yourself. Start out and see where things go. You never know where one page of dialogue can take you! 

      Thank you Sarah - for appreciating my series and all the hard work that we all put into it! 


      To answer your question...the process can be anything that gets you to your end result. I can tell you how I created "Conversations in L.A." - which is probably not the atypical process for anyone creating a show. 

      "Conversations in L.A." began for me as a play that was called "Conversations." The story was with a man and a woman who were meeting at a veterinarian office, the lobby. They were both about to euthanize their pets. I worked on that for a while and then put it away. A year later, when I moved to Los Angeles, I decided to pick that material up again  - because I needed material (as an actress) for a film/television reel. Interestingly enough, I changed the names of my characters, I altered the story - radically - and from one scene, I wrote another, and another, and then kept going. Why did I do this? Because I needed to. Those characters NEEDED to talk to each other. I began to find a flow from this dialogue they, and then other characters, started to have. 

      Once I realized I had a series - season one - I just kept going. I built a website for my series, submitted to the Daytime Emmy's - submitted to other festivals, and got my work out there the best I could. 

      Now I continue to do that with higher aspirations and bigger goals. The idea is to keep creating goals for yourself. Start out and see where things go. You never know where one page of dialogue can take you! 

  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    1y ago New York, NY, United States

    So exciting you all are here! When did you all know you wanted to be artists? What is your advice on those wanting to follow in your footsteps? 

    So exciting you all are here! When did you all know you wanted to be artists? What is your advice on those wanting to follow in your footsteps? 

    • gustavock1
      1y ago Los Angeles, CA, USA

      Hello Bethany! 


      The acting bug did not fully hit me until I graduated from college. I remember my last year of college. I was taking tax and audit classes finishing my accounting degree at Cal State Fullerton and driving one hour to Los Angeles after class to take acting classes. I would give audit presentations with my guitar. Talk about being confused. I was doing both because I could not fully decide what I wanted to do with my life. Once I graduated and received the dream job offers from PwC and E&Y, everything was clear. I just saw my life flash before my eyes. I asked myself, when im 80 years old, how do I want to look back on my life. All I knew, is when I watched movies, I was transported into a different universe. When I listened to music, the world would stop. I was never classically trained and had not been exposed to the arts. My family was business oriented. But their was a fire burning deep inside me. I decided to take a huge chance on myself and decided to pursue acting. After college I began playing acoustic guitar, electric guitar, violin, keyboard and ukulele. I started taking hip-hop dance classes. I started taking every acting class I could. I started surfing and mountain biking. I truly immersed myself in the arts and outdoor world. This has been the best decision I have ever made! 

      Advice for those following the artist dream.
      Look at your artistry as a business. You are an entrepreneur. Marketing, branding yourself, your craft is all a business. Your craft is your product. You also are a product. Los Angeles is the best city to be in for Film/TV. You will need to get a stable, flexible night job that allows you to audition during the day. Server/bartender is the best. SAVE all your money! INVEST in your business, acting classes, workshops, headshots and everything associated with the industry. NEVER be cheap with your business. ALWAYS be cheap with everything else. Live below your means, save every dollar. Los Angeles is an easy city to get caught up in the "lifestyle". But as an artist, you have to INVEST in yourself, not the lifestyle. This industry is about LONGEVITY. Those who are smart with their finances will last. I have seen so many actors come and go because of this very reason. Focus on your craft, have financially stability with a night job, and never forget you are running a business. Learn everything there is to know about this industry. Never stop learning. And things will get hard, you will feel like giving up, you will cry, you will get depressed, you will lose hope. BUT. NEVER EVER EVER EVER GIVE UP!!!! We only live once. Make the best of it. Be smart. Be passionate. Be focused. 

      Hello Bethany! 


      The acting bug did not fully hit me until I graduated from college. I remember my last year of college. I was taking tax and audit classes finishing my accounting degree at Cal State Fullerton and driving one hour to Los Angeles after class to take acting classes. I would give audit presentations with my guitar. Talk about being confused. I was doing both because I could not fully decide what I wanted to do with my life. Once I graduated and received the dream job offers from PwC and E&Y, everything was clear. I just saw my life flash before my eyes. I asked myself, when im 80 years old, how do I want to look back on my life. All I knew, is when I watched movies, I was transported into a different universe. When I listened to music, the world would stop. I was never classically trained and had not been exposed to the arts. My family was business oriented. But their was a fire burning deep inside me. I decided to take a huge chance on myself and decided to pursue acting. After college I began playing acoustic guitar, electric guitar, violin, keyboard and ukulele. I started taking hip-hop dance classes. I started taking every acting class I could. I started surfing and mountain biking. I truly immersed myself in the arts and outdoor world. This has been the best decision I have ever made! 

      Advice for those following the artist dream.
      Look at your artistry as a business. You are an entrepreneur. Marketing, branding yourself, your craft is all a business. Your craft is your product. You also are a product. Los Angeles is the best city to be in for Film/TV. You will need to get a stable, flexible night job that allows you to audition during the day. Server/bartender is the best. SAVE all your money! INVEST in your business, acting classes, workshops, headshots and everything associated with the industry. NEVER be cheap with your business. ALWAYS be cheap with everything else. Live below your means, save every dollar. Los Angeles is an easy city to get caught up in the "lifestyle". But as an artist, you have to INVEST in yourself, not the lifestyle. This industry is about LONGEVITY. Those who are smart with their finances will last. I have seen so many actors come and go because of this very reason. Focus on your craft, have financially stability with a night job, and never forget you are running a business. Learn everything there is to know about this industry. Never stop learning. And things will get hard, you will feel like giving up, you will cry, you will get depressed, you will lose hope. BUT. NEVER EVER EVER EVER GIVE UP!!!! We only live once. Make the best of it. Be smart. Be passionate. Be focused. 

    • amcummings
      1y ago

      Hey Bethany! Great questions! I didn't really understand what being an artist meant until I started reading books about acting by Constantin Stanisklavski. I was about 15 at the time. As soon as I began to understand that there was a process BEHIND all that I saw actors doing, that intrigued me. That was when I realized that the process was as important as the end result. The artistic process for me - to this day - is as important as the end result. A great end result is usually, in my mind, because the process was detailed, focused, fun, different, engaging, and very satisfying. 

      Advice to follow in my footsteps? Don't follow in my footsteps! Follow your own. Find your own. It takes time to find your voice as a writer. But if you do write - make sure you're saying something important and find a unique way to say it. 

      Hey Bethany! Great questions! I didn't really understand what being an artist meant until I started reading books about acting by Constantin Stanisklavski. I was about 15 at the time. As soon as I began to understand that there was a process BEHIND all that I saw actors doing, that intrigued me. That was when I realized that the process was as important as the end result. The artistic process for me - to this day - is as important as the end result. A great end result is usually, in my mind, because the process was detailed, focused, fun, different, engaging, and very satisfying. 

      Advice to follow in my footsteps? Don't follow in my footsteps! Follow your own. Find your own. It takes time to find your voice as a writer. But if you do write - make sure you're saying something important and find a unique way to say it. 


Anne Marie Cummings
Creator, Writer, Director, Star & and Executive Producer of Daytime Emmy-Award nominated series, “Conversations in L.A.”

Since moving to Los Angeles in 2015, Cummings studied screenwriting with Ron Osborn (writer for the award-winning TV shows “Moonlighting” and “The West Wing”) and wrote her first screenplay, a culinary romantic comedy, “Eat Bitter, Taste Sweet” - to be directed by Wendey Stanzler (“Sex and the [...]

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