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#AskAMogul:Hi,I'mSecretaryMadeleineK.Albright.IamthefirstfemaleSecretaryofStateoftheUS.Askmeanything.I'llbeansweringquestions10/14@11:30amET.UPDATE:LiveInterviewInserted.

Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
over 1 year Conversation

Secretary Albright will be answering questions in a special filmed interview on Saturday, October 14th at 11:30am ET. To ask a question, click here to create a Mogul profile, then post a question in the comment section below.


Hello. My name is Madeleine K. Albright. I'm the Chair of Albright Stonebridge Group, a global strategy firm, and Chair of Albright Capital Management LLC, an investment advisory firm focused on emerging markets. 

I am the 64th Secretary of State of the United States. In 1997, I was named the first female Secretary of State and became, at that time, the highest ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government. 

From 1993 to 1997, I served as the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations and was a member of the President’s Cabinet. I am a Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. 

I chair the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs and am also the president of the Truman Scholarship Foundation. In addition, I'm a member of an advisory body, the U.S. Defense Department’s Defense Policy Board. In 2012, I was chosen by President Obama to receive the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in recognition of my contributions to international peace and democracy.

Please ask me anything. Please write your questions in the comments section below and I'll answer the questions live on Saturday, October 14th at 11:30am ET.

34 replies

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  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    over 1 year ago New York, NY, United States

    Hello! I will be interviewing Secretary Albright at 11:30am ET and will be embedding the video this afternoon! We will be asking her the majority of your wonderful questions. Thank you!

    Hello! I will be interviewing Secretary Albright at 11:30am ET and will be embedding the video this afternoon! We will be asking her the majority of your wonderful questions. Thank you!

  • Margaret Horowitz 27
    over 1 year ago

    Hello Secretary Albright, how does our Congress and all of its seasoned leaders allow President Trump to continue to promote and support destructive, divisive and dangerous foreign policy directives?  How can they sit in silence, and allow this continue?  What can we as citizens do? I want to be involved for the sake of my children and this amazing country.

    Hello Secretary Albright, how does our Congress and all of its seasoned leaders allow President Trump to continue to promote and support destructive, divisive and dangerous foreign policy directives?  How can they sit in silence, and allow this continue?  What can we as citizens do? I want to be involved for the sake of my children and this amazing country.

  • Illana Raia 76
    Illana Raia 76 Founder, Être
    over 1 year ago New Jersey, United States

    Question from middle school Êtregirls: "What is the biggest problem facing girls around the globe today, and what can girls our age do to help? We know we're too young to vote, but we're old enough to want to make a difference."

    Question from middle school Êtregirls: "What is the biggest problem facing girls around the globe today, and what can girls our age do to help? We know we're too young to vote, but we're old enough to want to make a difference."

  • Abby Norman
    Abby Norman Science Writer & Editor
    over 1 year ago Maine, United States

    What do you believe to be the most powerful thing a woman can know about herself? 

    What do you believe to be the most powerful thing a woman can know about herself? 

  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    over 1 year ago New York, NY, United States

    As one of the most high-powered American diplomats to have ever visited North Korea, what were your takeaways from your time there, and what is your advice to President Trump and the State Department in terms of how we need to approach foreign policy with North Korea?  

    As one of the most high-powered American diplomats to have ever visited North Korea, what were your takeaways from your time there, and what is your advice to President Trump and the State Department in terms of how we need to approach foreign policy with North Korea?  

    • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
      Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
      over 1 year ago

      Well, the North Korean issue has been complicated since 1953, the end of the North Korean War or the Korean War. And, basically, we don’t have a peace treaty with them. It’s an armistice. And the North Koreans want to be recognized by the United States, that is their goal. In the meantime, they are doing perfectly horrible things to their own people: starving them in many ways and propagandizing to really hate Americans. There’s no question. And they have along the way been developing a lot of weapons and they have a million man army and they are very dangerous. The story when the Clinton administration was in office is also a very complicated one. We had a number of agreements with them and I went in 2000 there in order to talk to them about their missile limits and their nuclear program. And it was very interesting because we don’t have an embassy there, so you never kind of know what’s going to happen. But my takeaway was that we don’t gain by not knowing what’s going on there. And what did happen was that I was over in the middle of negotiations about the missile limits. Kim Jong Il, the father of the current leader, did want to talk to us. And I spent time with him, he was not crazy, we were able to have some productive discussions, but then what happened was the election of 2000 and President Clinton’s time was up. I briefed Secretary Powell on what we were doing and he wanted to continue the talks and then there was a headline in the Washington Post that said “Powell to Continue Clinton Policies on Korea”. He was hauled into the White House and told ‘no way’. So, I hold no brief for the North Koreans. They have lied and cheated, but I think that we need to talk to them. And diplomacy and talks are not a gift to the other side. They are a way that you try to determine what the issues are and how to resolve them. But I also do think, and I teach a course on the national security tools that we have, there are not a lot of them, frankly. There are diplomacy, bilateral and multilateral, there are the economic tools which are aid and trade and sanctions, and then various levels of the threat or the use of force and intelligence and law enforcement. That’s not a lot. So, I wouldn’t take any of the tools off the table, but I do think that what is important is for us to look for ways to have diplomatic talks and to use the sanctions process, which I think has been important in terms of sanctions that the security council has put on multilateral sanctions that the Chinese and Russians voted for. And to not make idle threats. What I am most concerned about at the moment is an accident of some kind where we are flying, we do need to have a deterrence posture, and that something happen that is an accident that then does lead to worse things.  

      Well, the North Korean issue has been complicated since 1953, the end of the North Korean War or the Korean War. And, basically, we don’t have a peace treaty with them. It’s an armistice. And the North Koreans want to be recognized by the United States, that is their goal. In the meantime, they are doing perfectly horrible things to their own people: starving them in many ways and propagandizing to really hate Americans. There’s no question. And they have along the way been developing a lot of weapons and they have a million man army and they are very dangerous. The story when the Clinton administration was in office is also a very complicated one. We had a number of agreements with them and I went in 2000 there in order to talk to them about their missile limits and their nuclear program. And it was very interesting because we don’t have an embassy there, so you never kind of know what’s going to happen. But my takeaway was that we don’t gain by not knowing what’s going on there. And what did happen was that I was over in the middle of negotiations about the missile limits. Kim Jong Il, the father of the current leader, did want to talk to us. And I spent time with him, he was not crazy, we were able to have some productive discussions, but then what happened was the election of 2000 and President Clinton’s time was up. I briefed Secretary Powell on what we were doing and he wanted to continue the talks and then there was a headline in the Washington Post that said “Powell to Continue Clinton Policies on Korea”. He was hauled into the White House and told ‘no way’. So, I hold no brief for the North Koreans. They have lied and cheated, but I think that we need to talk to them. And diplomacy and talks are not a gift to the other side. They are a way that you try to determine what the issues are and how to resolve them. But I also do think, and I teach a course on the national security tools that we have, there are not a lot of them, frankly. There are diplomacy, bilateral and multilateral, there are the economic tools which are aid and trade and sanctions, and then various levels of the threat or the use of force and intelligence and law enforcement. That’s not a lot. So, I wouldn’t take any of the tools off the table, but I do think that what is important is for us to look for ways to have diplomatic talks and to use the sanctions process, which I think has been important in terms of sanctions that the security council has put on multilateral sanctions that the Chinese and Russians voted for. And to not make idle threats. What I am most concerned about at the moment is an accident of some kind where we are flying, we do need to have a deterrence posture, and that something happen that is an accident that then does lead to worse things.  

    • Jan Johnston Osburn
      Jan Johnston Osburn Mogul Influencer | Career & Life Coach | Helping People Turn Dreams into Realities
      over 1 year ago Washington, DC, United States

      Thank you, Bethany for this question.  I, too, would like to know how the Secretary would approach North Korea.  I have not been able to figure out what North Korea wants?  Madam Secretary, why do you believe that North Korea is acting like they are?  What do you think they are trying to accomplish?   And, finally, what is the answer?  Nothing has helped yet?  Do you think the US will be involved in a military strike?  It's scary times. 

      Thank you, Bethany for this question.  I, too, would like to know how the Secretary would approach North Korea.  I have not been able to figure out what North Korea wants?  Madam Secretary, why do you believe that North Korea is acting like they are?  What do you think they are trying to accomplish?   And, finally, what is the answer?  Nothing has helped yet?  Do you think the US will be involved in a military strike?  It's scary times. 

  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    over 1 year ago New York, NY, United States

    Looking back at your incredible journey, what advice would you give to your 20-year-old self?  

    Looking back at your incredible journey, what advice would you give to your 20-year-old self?  

    • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
      Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
      over 1 year ago

      Well my 20-year-old self, I was in college still. And I did give advice to myself then to study hard and work hard. But basically I think it would have been to realize that for a woman to succeed, it was very hard to make a life plan, and it was necessary to be flexible. And to use whatever capabilities one had to have a productive and interesting life. So, for instance, I was going to be a journalist. I worked on my college paper. It ended up I married a journalist and I worked on a small newspaper while he was in the Army. And then we moved to Chicago and we're sitting there with his managing editor. I was 22 at that stage. And he said to me, "So what are you going to do, honey?" and I said "I'm going to be a journalist" and he said "I don't think so. You can't work on the same paper as your husband because of labor regulations." And even though there were three other papers in Chicago at the time, he said, "and you wouldn't want to compete with your husband." And instead of saying what you might say or what I might say today, I basically saluted and found another life. But the bottom line is, I think that what I would say to my 20-year-old self, or my daughters, or you is basically that having a passion and being curious and wanting to make a difference is what's important. And to be flexible that you might not be doing what you thought you were going to do, but whatever talents you have and the desire to work hard is what one needs. And to not think that there's a life plan that you can follow from 20-age on. Always evolving. 

      Well my 20-year-old self, I was in college still. And I did give advice to myself then to study hard and work hard. But basically I think it would have been to realize that for a woman to succeed, it was very hard to make a life plan, and it was necessary to be flexible. And to use whatever capabilities one had to have a productive and interesting life. So, for instance, I was going to be a journalist. I worked on my college paper. It ended up I married a journalist and I worked on a small newspaper while he was in the Army. And then we moved to Chicago and we're sitting there with his managing editor. I was 22 at that stage. And he said to me, "So what are you going to do, honey?" and I said "I'm going to be a journalist" and he said "I don't think so. You can't work on the same paper as your husband because of labor regulations." And even though there were three other papers in Chicago at the time, he said, "and you wouldn't want to compete with your husband." And instead of saying what you might say or what I might say today, I basically saluted and found another life. But the bottom line is, I think that what I would say to my 20-year-old self, or my daughters, or you is basically that having a passion and being curious and wanting to make a difference is what's important. And to be flexible that you might not be doing what you thought you were going to do, but whatever talents you have and the desire to work hard is what one needs. And to not think that there's a life plan that you can follow from 20-age on. Always evolving. 

  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    over 1 year ago New York, NY, United States

    You teach your students at Georgetown that the essence of foreign policy is “just trying to get somebody to do what you want and that that involves using a variety of tools”. Which tools do you think President Trump should be using right now regarding the Iran deal? 

    You teach your students at Georgetown that the essence of foreign policy is “just trying to get somebody to do what you want and that that involves using a variety of tools”. Which tools do you think President Trump should be using right now regarding the Iran deal? 

    • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
      Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
      over 1 year ago

      Well, I think that he has already, I think, taken a step that is not useful. What is interesting is the Iran Deal was not just an American deal, it's a multilateral deal, P5+1, other countries have been involved. And the international system, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been, they have provided inspectors, they have gone, and they themselves have said that they have gotten better access out of the Iran, the agreement itself, than they ever had before. And so for the United States all of a sudden to decertify is not a good idea. And I think that one of the issues that's important to recognize is that there are many issues with Iran. I know you were talking about Syria and what's going on in the Middle East. Not everything was a part of the agreement itself. That had to do specifically with them giving up large, most of their centrifuges and sending their enriched uranium, getting rid of that, a number of very specific goals to do with their nuclear program, not with everything else. And I think the mistake is coupling everything together. And one can't say that their behavior is terrific. But this has been an international, multilateral agreement that we have now given the Iranians an excuse. And we have, I think, made much more complicated our relationships with the other countries that are part of this agreement. And so I think that what happened where by having the President not offer to certify and kind of put it in Congress' hands, he has weakened America, not strengthened America. And I really do think that diplomacy, and deals like this are not like real estate deals. This is not the same kind of, this is not business, this is diplomacy that a lot of people's lives depend on. And so I think this was an unnecessary step and I'm hoping very much that Congress will in fact do what it needs to, which is to understand that we don't want to get out of this, and that there are other agreements that can be made with Iran that deal with some of the issues that the President is concerned about, which is the way that they use some of their missiles and some of their other behavior within the Middle East. But it doesn't depend on tearing apart what has been and continues to be a very useful agreement, in terms of getting some kind of control over Iran's nuclear program. So I think that's the important part. 

      Well, I think that he has already, I think, taken a step that is not useful. What is interesting is the Iran Deal was not just an American deal, it's a multilateral deal, P5+1, other countries have been involved. And the international system, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been, they have provided inspectors, they have gone, and they themselves have said that they have gotten better access out of the Iran, the agreement itself, than they ever had before. And so for the United States all of a sudden to decertify is not a good idea. And I think that one of the issues that's important to recognize is that there are many issues with Iran. I know you were talking about Syria and what's going on in the Middle East. Not everything was a part of the agreement itself. That had to do specifically with them giving up large, most of their centrifuges and sending their enriched uranium, getting rid of that, a number of very specific goals to do with their nuclear program, not with everything else. And I think the mistake is coupling everything together. And one can't say that their behavior is terrific. But this has been an international, multilateral agreement that we have now given the Iranians an excuse. And we have, I think, made much more complicated our relationships with the other countries that are part of this agreement. And so I think that what happened where by having the President not offer to certify and kind of put it in Congress' hands, he has weakened America, not strengthened America. And I really do think that diplomacy, and deals like this are not like real estate deals. This is not the same kind of, this is not business, this is diplomacy that a lot of people's lives depend on. And so I think this was an unnecessary step and I'm hoping very much that Congress will in fact do what it needs to, which is to understand that we don't want to get out of this, and that there are other agreements that can be made with Iran that deal with some of the issues that the President is concerned about, which is the way that they use some of their missiles and some of their other behavior within the Middle East. But it doesn't depend on tearing apart what has been and continues to be a very useful agreement, in terms of getting some kind of control over Iran's nuclear program. So I think that's the important part. 

  • Jenna 84
    over 1 year ago

    As a trailblazer who has paved the way for women in leadership positions, particularly in politics, were there ever moments where you felt it was more difficult to have your voice heard and how did you deal with those moments?  

    As a trailblazer who has paved the way for women in leadership positions, particularly in politics, were there ever moments where you felt it was more difficult to have your voice heard and how did you deal with those moments?  

    • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
      Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
      over 1 year ago

      Well, I think a number of times, frankly, because often as the only woman in the room, and I’m sure that every one of the women that are watching this have had this experience, you think to yourself, “Well, I want to say something and then you think ‘Well no it’s going to sound stupid’, so you don’t say it. And then some man says it and everybody keeps saying, “You know as Joe said, that was really terrific” and you are so mad at yourself for not saying something. And so I have trained myself, and I’ve talked to other women about this, is to decide that you are going to interrupt, no matter what. But in order to do that you have to know what you are talking about, and to have a strong voice and be determined, I kind of made up this term, active listening to figure out when you should interrupt. Now, did it always work? No. And one of the things that does happen, and again, I bet this has happened to every woman, you argue for something very strongly, and somebody says “don’t be so emotional”. And I specifically, when I was Ambassador at the United Nations, and I was very concerned about what was happening to, in Bosnia with ethnic cleansing. I said, you know, I was really arguing very hard, and I was told not to be so emotional. And so, you learn to argue in somewhat of a different tone. 

      Well, I think a number of times, frankly, because often as the only woman in the room, and I’m sure that every one of the women that are watching this have had this experience, you think to yourself, “Well, I want to say something and then you think ‘Well no it’s going to sound stupid’, so you don’t say it. And then some man says it and everybody keeps saying, “You know as Joe said, that was really terrific” and you are so mad at yourself for not saying something. And so I have trained myself, and I’ve talked to other women about this, is to decide that you are going to interrupt, no matter what. But in order to do that you have to know what you are talking about, and to have a strong voice and be determined, I kind of made up this term, active listening to figure out when you should interrupt. Now, did it always work? No. And one of the things that does happen, and again, I bet this has happened to every woman, you argue for something very strongly, and somebody says “don’t be so emotional”. And I specifically, when I was Ambassador at the United Nations, and I was very concerned about what was happening to, in Bosnia with ethnic cleansing. I said, you know, I was really arguing very hard, and I was told not to be so emotional. And so, you learn to argue in somewhat of a different tone. 

  • Leah 94
    over 1 year ago

    I was very sad to learn about your grandparents being lost in the Holocaust. How did learning that information change you as a person and how did it inform your approach to diplomacy and fighting for human rights?  

    I was very sad to learn about your grandparents being lost in the Holocaust. How did learning that information change you as a person and how did it inform your approach to diplomacy and fighting for human rights?  

    • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
      Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
      over 1 year ago

      Well, let me just say I had understood the importance of America's role long before I found out about my Jewish background. And in fact I had been, I didn't find out about that until just before I became Secretary of State. And yet before that I had been Ambassador to the United Nations. And my behavior there had a lot to do with what I saw was going on in the Balkans where people were being ethnically cleansed - not for anything they had done, but who they were. Just deciding because they were non Serbs or Muslims that they needed to be removed from where they lived. And so I was a child of World War II and I understood what happened if the United States didn't speak up for those that were being punished for no reason whatsoever. And so finding out about my Jewish background was something that made me feel terribly sorry for my parents because they were dead by the time that I found out. And I was trying to put myself into their shoes about how they must have felt. We spent the war in England and they had left their parents behind in Czechoslovakia, and obviously when they returned everybody was dead. I was a child so I didn't have any, you know, I didn't know my grandparents beyond knowing them when I was two. But, mostly, the finding out about my personal story just made me feel desperately sorry for my parents and also appreciate more what they had done for us, in terms of protecting us. But it didn't change my view of how people - what responsibilities countries had towards each other, what the role of the United States had to be in terms of making sure that these kinds of things did not go on in other parts of the world. And I was so proud to represent the United States. So, that's why I'm kind of troubled by the direction that we're taking now. Where we believe that our strength is separating us from other countries, that we can do everything by ourselves. We can't in the 21st century. We need friends and allies, we need to be true to our word, we need to have agreements. And if we just kind of renounce them because they were done by a previous administration, we weaken America. I think what has happened with Iran, President Trump has weakened America. You need to recognize, I keep saying this over and over again, talking to another country is not a sign of weakness. It is not a gift. It is the tool that is needed in order to solve problems. That's why we have diplomats. 

      Well, let me just say I had understood the importance of America's role long before I found out about my Jewish background. And in fact I had been, I didn't find out about that until just before I became Secretary of State. And yet before that I had been Ambassador to the United Nations. And my behavior there had a lot to do with what I saw was going on in the Balkans where people were being ethnically cleansed - not for anything they had done, but who they were. Just deciding because they were non Serbs or Muslims that they needed to be removed from where they lived. And so I was a child of World War II and I understood what happened if the United States didn't speak up for those that were being punished for no reason whatsoever. And so finding out about my Jewish background was something that made me feel terribly sorry for my parents because they were dead by the time that I found out. And I was trying to put myself into their shoes about how they must have felt. We spent the war in England and they had left their parents behind in Czechoslovakia, and obviously when they returned everybody was dead. I was a child so I didn't have any, you know, I didn't know my grandparents beyond knowing them when I was two. But, mostly, the finding out about my personal story just made me feel desperately sorry for my parents and also appreciate more what they had done for us, in terms of protecting us. But it didn't change my view of how people - what responsibilities countries had towards each other, what the role of the United States had to be in terms of making sure that these kinds of things did not go on in other parts of the world. And I was so proud to represent the United States. So, that's why I'm kind of troubled by the direction that we're taking now. Where we believe that our strength is separating us from other countries, that we can do everything by ourselves. We can't in the 21st century. We need friends and allies, we need to be true to our word, we need to have agreements. And if we just kind of renounce them because they were done by a previous administration, we weaken America. I think what has happened with Iran, President Trump has weakened America. You need to recognize, I keep saying this over and over again, talking to another country is not a sign of weakness. It is not a gift. It is the tool that is needed in order to solve problems. That's why we have diplomats. 

  • Sarah Fein
    over 1 year ago

    You once stated that as Secretary of State, you felt that women’s issues had to be central to American foreign policy because you believe societies are better off when women are politically and economically empowered. What do you believe needs to be done in places like the Middle East, such as Syria, where Yazidi women are being enslaved by ISIS?  

    You once stated that as Secretary of State, you felt that women’s issues had to be central to American foreign policy because you believe societies are better off when women are politically and economically empowered. What do you believe needs to be done in places like the Middle East, such as Syria, where Yazidi women are being enslaved by ISIS?  

    • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
      Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
      over 1 year ago

      Well, I think that, I’m Chairman of the Board of an organization called the National Democratic Institute, and one of the things that we do - generally - is to try to support women in political work and try to get women - teach women about how to run for office, how to support each other, specifically. Then, one of the things that has happened, unfortunately, is that as more women have run for office, there has been more violence against women and threats against their families. And I’ve been doing some work, and the National Democratic Institute has with the United Nations in terms of - it’s a campaign called #NotTheCost - so that one doesn’t have to put up with having their family threatened if more women really run for office. But I do think having women in political office is important. And I think we also have to speak out on behalf of women, the Yazidi women for one, but others that are not able to speak for themselves. And talk about the fact that we, injustice committed against women, enslavement, or any number of activities that take place, we need to speak out on behalf of other women. What we can’t do, however, is completely mirror image that everybody wants to be like an American woman. I’ve found that out, which I find very interesting, is that women want to have rights within the society in which they exist. And, for instance, what was very interesting - after the end of the Cold War, I did a lot of surveys in Central and Eastern Europe in former Communist countries, and it used to be that women in Communist countries were liberated to do twice as much work. They were able to work but they still had to take care of their families. And they wanted to have what they called normal lives, to be able to choose what they wanted to. And so for me, it is always the same word: women need to have a CHOICE to do what they want to, and we need to support the women to be able to choose what they want to do. Not what their societies are telling them to do.  

      Well, I think that, I’m Chairman of the Board of an organization called the National Democratic Institute, and one of the things that we do - generally - is to try to support women in political work and try to get women - teach women about how to run for office, how to support each other, specifically. Then, one of the things that has happened, unfortunately, is that as more women have run for office, there has been more violence against women and threats against their families. And I’ve been doing some work, and the National Democratic Institute has with the United Nations in terms of - it’s a campaign called #NotTheCost - so that one doesn’t have to put up with having their family threatened if more women really run for office. But I do think having women in political office is important. And I think we also have to speak out on behalf of women, the Yazidi women for one, but others that are not able to speak for themselves. And talk about the fact that we, injustice committed against women, enslavement, or any number of activities that take place, we need to speak out on behalf of other women. What we can’t do, however, is completely mirror image that everybody wants to be like an American woman. I’ve found that out, which I find very interesting, is that women want to have rights within the society in which they exist. And, for instance, what was very interesting - after the end of the Cold War, I did a lot of surveys in Central and Eastern Europe in former Communist countries, and it used to be that women in Communist countries were liberated to do twice as much work. They were able to work but they still had to take care of their families. And they wanted to have what they called normal lives, to be able to choose what they wanted to. And so for me, it is always the same word: women need to have a CHOICE to do what they want to, and we need to support the women to be able to choose what they want to do. Not what their societies are telling them to do.  

    • Jan Johnston Osburn
      Jan Johnston Osburn Mogul Influencer | Career & Life Coach | Helping People Turn Dreams into Realities
      over 1 year ago Washington, DC, United States

      Thank you, Sarah.   I would also like to hear the answer to this.  How do we stop this and things like FGM?  

      Thank you, Sarah.   I would also like to hear the answer to this.  How do we stop this and things like FGM?  

    • Sarah Fein
      over 1 year ago

      What in your opinion needs to be done to bring peace to the region in general, specifically addressing how to confront ISIS and the Assad regime?  

      What in your opinion needs to be done to bring peace to the region in general, specifically addressing how to confront ISIS and the Assad regime?  

      • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
        Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
        over 1 year ago

        Well, I think it’s an incredibly complicated question. And one of the things that has happened is not enough attention was paid initially to what was going on in Syria. And the situation in the Middle East is as complicated as anything because there are struggles that are historic between Persians and Arabs and then between – most Americans knew nothing about Islam, much less the difference between the Shia and the Sunni, but that’s part of this also. And then some just plain, a dictator wanting to control his country – Assad. And so, I think that we have to keep working in the region with the local forces, and work toward some kind of a transitional government. That’s my personal view. I think the fact that Assad used chemical weapons against his own people makes it impossible for us to be supportive of him, but we also do not want ISIS running the whole area. And what has happened is that, as a result of unified work, is that ISIS has been kind of been pushed out of a lot of territory. And so now the question is how to rebuild Syria in a way where the various differences are recognized because not everybody is the same, and to really kind of look at local areas – what can be done. And there’s a genuine question in terms of - is it really one country? There are so many differences and the borders that are there. So it’s going to require not only American involvement, but kind of a regional approach to what is going on there. Very complex. And then the Russians are playing a peculiar role. So, it’s truly about as complicated as any situation could possibly be. 

        Well, I think it’s an incredibly complicated question. And one of the things that has happened is not enough attention was paid initially to what was going on in Syria. And the situation in the Middle East is as complicated as anything because there are struggles that are historic between Persians and Arabs and then between – most Americans knew nothing about Islam, much less the difference between the Shia and the Sunni, but that’s part of this also. And then some just plain, a dictator wanting to control his country – Assad. And so, I think that we have to keep working in the region with the local forces, and work toward some kind of a transitional government. That’s my personal view. I think the fact that Assad used chemical weapons against his own people makes it impossible for us to be supportive of him, but we also do not want ISIS running the whole area. And what has happened is that, as a result of unified work, is that ISIS has been kind of been pushed out of a lot of territory. And so now the question is how to rebuild Syria in a way where the various differences are recognized because not everybody is the same, and to really kind of look at local areas – what can be done. And there’s a genuine question in terms of - is it really one country? There are so many differences and the borders that are there. So it’s going to require not only American involvement, but kind of a regional approach to what is going on there. Very complex. And then the Russians are playing a peculiar role. So, it’s truly about as complicated as any situation could possibly be. 

  • jessiex
    jessiex Mogul at Wellesley President
    over 1 year ago Wellesley, MA, United States

    Dear Secretary Albright,


    On behalf of the Wellesley community as the Mogul at Wellesley President, I'd like to say that we love you so incredibly much! One of the key motivating factors for us students to continue struggling through our 10-paged papers and 100-paged readings is the belief that we will each break our own glass ceiling as you broke yours as the first female Secretary of State. My question is: when you were in college, did you know exactly that you wanted to become Secretary of State? If so, what were some ways you prepared yourself to accomplish your goal and combat any social barriers?

    Thank you,
    Jessie Xiao

    Dear Secretary Albright,


    On behalf of the Wellesley community as the Mogul at Wellesley President, I'd like to say that we love you so incredibly much! One of the key motivating factors for us students to continue struggling through our 10-paged papers and 100-paged readings is the belief that we will each break our own glass ceiling as you broke yours as the first female Secretary of State. My question is: when you were in college, did you know exactly that you wanted to become Secretary of State? If so, what were some ways you prepared yourself to accomplish your goal and combat any social barriers?

    Thank you,
    Jessie Xiao

  • Alana Higa
    Alana Higa Head of Mogul @ Work // President of Fordham University
    over 1 year ago New York, NY, United States

    Aloha Secretary Albright,

    It's such a pleasure to have you here on Mogul. My question for you today is, "What is your number one piece of advice for women hoping to pursue a career in government and/or politics?"

    Aloha Secretary Albright,

    It's such a pleasure to have you here on Mogul. My question for you today is, "What is your number one piece of advice for women hoping to pursue a career in government and/or politics?"

    • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
      Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
      over 1 year ago

      Well, first of all, women in this country and in many countries are more than half the population. And I think that we are robbing ourselves of a great set of people that can be contributors to solving problems. So, that is #1. I also think that when there are more women in the political system, that it brings a different approach to things and that we often have a capability of finding out what - you know a good diplomat or anybody that’s involved, you need to put yourself into somebody else’s shoes. We’re pretty good about doing that. But mostly, I believe that it’s an important aspect of how our societies operate: to have women politically and economically empowered. And, so, it’s a matter of just being smart to get more women involved, but it also is the idea of having more than one woman. I can’t tell you how I keep stressing this is: you don’t want to be the only woman in the room. It may make you feel like the Queen Bee, but it’s much better to have other women with you and to really have a support system. 

      Well, first of all, women in this country and in many countries are more than half the population. And I think that we are robbing ourselves of a great set of people that can be contributors to solving problems. So, that is #1. I also think that when there are more women in the political system, that it brings a different approach to things and that we often have a capability of finding out what - you know a good diplomat or anybody that’s involved, you need to put yourself into somebody else’s shoes. We’re pretty good about doing that. But mostly, I believe that it’s an important aspect of how our societies operate: to have women politically and economically empowered. And, so, it’s a matter of just being smart to get more women involved, but it also is the idea of having more than one woman. I can’t tell you how I keep stressing this is: you don’t want to be the only woman in the room. It may make you feel like the Queen Bee, but it’s much better to have other women with you and to really have a support system. 

  • meghashah1997
    meghashah1997 Mogul Global Ambassador
    over 1 year ago Kolkata, West Bengal, India

    Hello Secretary Albright, 

    It is a privilege to be able to connect with you. My question is:

    As women aspire to take up greater roles across industries various fields, what is the one advice you like to give to young women who are trying to leave a mark on this world? 

    Thank you so much.  You're truly an inspiration!! 

    Hello Secretary Albright, 

    It is a privilege to be able to connect with you. My question is:

    As women aspire to take up greater roles across industries various fields, what is the one advice you like to give to young women who are trying to leave a mark on this world? 

    Thank you so much.  You're truly an inspiration!! 

  • Natasha
    Natasha 💪🏻& 👊🏻 just like NYC
    over 1 year ago New York, NY, United States

    What would you advise women to do in today's political climate to help change the status quo and fight for gender equality and parity in the workplace?

    What would you advise women to do in today's political climate to help change the status quo and fight for gender equality and parity in the workplace?

    • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
      Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
      over 1 year ago

      Well, I think that what has to happen is, to try to figure out what, every workplace is a little bit different, but to make sure that women are accorded the jobs for which we are prepared. I don’t think that, one of the statements I’ve made an awful lot of times is, there’s plenty of room for mediocre men, there is no room for mediocre women. So, we really do have to push each other to work hard and to know what we’re talking about, and to deliver when you are asked to do a job and not make excuses. And I think an awful lot is more, more is asked of women. There’s no question about that. But I do think that what has to happen is to know what your goals are, to support each other to be qualified and to be extra qualified. And then I think not to be put off. But it is that combination of knowing what we can accomplish and to get the skills in order to be able to do that, no matter what line of work it is. We cannot ask for favors but we cannot be put down either. 

      Well, I think that what has to happen is, to try to figure out what, every workplace is a little bit different, but to make sure that women are accorded the jobs for which we are prepared. I don’t think that, one of the statements I’ve made an awful lot of times is, there’s plenty of room for mediocre men, there is no room for mediocre women. So, we really do have to push each other to work hard and to know what we’re talking about, and to deliver when you are asked to do a job and not make excuses. And I think an awful lot is more, more is asked of women. There’s no question about that. But I do think that what has to happen is to know what your goals are, to support each other to be qualified and to be extra qualified. And then I think not to be put off. But it is that combination of knowing what we can accomplish and to get the skills in order to be able to do that, no matter what line of work it is. We cannot ask for favors but we cannot be put down either. 

  • namisha
    namisha Inquisitive, Avid Reader, Food Lover, Amateur Chef, Digital Sensei
    over 1 year ago New York, NY, United States

    Politics is highly male dominated. How did you deal with it and ensure your voice was heard?

    Politics is highly male dominated. How did you deal with it and ensure your voice was heard?

  • Darlene Ineza
    Darlene Ineza Bowdoin College Mogul President
    over 1 year ago Brunswick, ME, United States

    What are your thoughts on the Trump administration's foreign policy? 

    What are your thoughts on the Trump administration's foreign policy? 

    • Danica
      over 1 year ago

      Amazing question. I was about to ask the same thing!

      Amazing question. I was about to ask the same thing!

  • Danica
    over 1 year ago

    What are your thoughts on the current state of the government?

    What are your thoughts on the current state of the government?

  • V
    over 1 year ago New York, NY, United States

    Hi Secretary Albright, 


    If you could recommend one book for all women to read, what would it be? 

    Hi Secretary Albright, 


    If you could recommend one book for all women to read, what would it be? 

  • Danica
    over 1 year ago

    Your quote: "There is a special place in hell for women who do not help other women." is so memorable and powerful. Why do you think women, especially young women, sometime find it hard to band together for the greater good of women everywhere?

    Your quote: "There is a special place in hell for women who do not help other women." is so memorable and powerful. Why do you think women, especially young women, sometime find it hard to band together for the greater good of women everywhere?

    • Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
      Secretary Madeleine K. Albright 64th Secretary of State of the United States
      over 1 year ago

      Well, the quote really comes from my own life because when I was trying to do different things like go to graduate school while I had little children, other women were very critical of what I was doing. You know, they’d say “Why aren’t you spending more time with your children?” or “I cook better than you do,” and were not even vaguely, not just not helpful, but really were downright judgmental about what I was doing. So, I do think that part of it has to do with our own issues in terms of thinking of we project our own sense of weakness on other women. And then there’s a certain sense of jealousy I think. There’s the Queen Bee syndrome, thinking if there’s only going to be one woman in the room then I’m going to be that woman. When instead, I think we are all stronger if there’s more than one woman in the room. And if you have a team of sisters that can be supportive of you and so, it’s not kind of zero sum, but it is a matter of having more women in the room.

      Well, the quote really comes from my own life because when I was trying to do different things like go to graduate school while I had little children, other women were very critical of what I was doing. You know, they’d say “Why aren’t you spending more time with your children?” or “I cook better than you do,” and were not even vaguely, not just not helpful, but really were downright judgmental about what I was doing. So, I do think that part of it has to do with our own issues in terms of thinking of we project our own sense of weakness on other women. And then there’s a certain sense of jealousy I think. There’s the Queen Bee syndrome, thinking if there’s only going to be one woman in the room then I’m going to be that woman. When instead, I think we are all stronger if there’s more than one woman in the room. And if you have a team of sisters that can be supportive of you and so, it’s not kind of zero sum, but it is a matter of having more women in the room.

    • Jan Johnston Osburn
      Jan Johnston Osburn Mogul Influencer | Career & Life Coach | Helping People Turn Dreams into Realities
      over 1 year ago Washington, DC, United States

      Dear Madam Secretary – We are honored to have you here. I actually have a follow-up to this question. I am conflicted when I hear a statement like “Special place in hell for women who don’t support other women.” I understand that intuitively and support women and raise them up. But I do not believe in blind support for women (or anyone) because there are sometimes things you simply do not agree with or you have a fundamental difference in one’s beliefs that goes against your core values. When you make a statement like that, I think it infers that there must be group think and that women are not intelligent enough to make the right decision based on facts or what is important to them personally. You cannot have blind support in any environment. In 2008 when Hillary Clinton was running against the future President Obama in the primaries, did you come out strongly and make the same statement then as you did in 2016? Should more women have supported Ms. Clinton in 2008? Because if so, we may not have seen ourselves where we are now, politically. Thank you

      Dear Madam Secretary – We are honored to have you here. I actually have a follow-up to this question. I am conflicted when I hear a statement like “Special place in hell for women who don’t support other women.” I understand that intuitively and support women and raise them up. But I do not believe in blind support for women (or anyone) because there are sometimes things you simply do not agree with or you have a fundamental difference in one’s beliefs that goes against your core values. When you make a statement like that, I think it infers that there must be group think and that women are not intelligent enough to make the right decision based on facts or what is important to them personally. You cannot have blind support in any environment. In 2008 when Hillary Clinton was running against the future President Obama in the primaries, did you come out strongly and make the same statement then as you did in 2016? Should more women have supported Ms. Clinton in 2008? Because if so, we may not have seen ourselves where we are now, politically. Thank you


Secretary Madeleine K. Albright
64th Secretary of State of the United States

Madeleine K. Albright is Chair of Albright Stonebridge Group, a global strategy firm, and Chair of Albright Capital Management LLC, an investment advisory firm focused on emerging markets. She was the 64th Secretary of State of the United States. Dr. Albright received the Presidential Medal of [...]

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