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AskAMogulAnything:Hi,I'mKatieCouric.I'maglobalnewsanchorwhohascoveredsomeoftheworld'smostimportantstoriesforthelastthreedecades.Askmeanythingyou'dlike!**UPDATEDwithanswersfromtheFacebookLivechat**

Katie Couric
Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
1y New York University, New York, NY, United States Question

**Your questions will be answered Tuesday, October 11th starting at 2:30 pm ET. To ask a question, click here to create a Mogul profile, then post a question in the comment section below! You can also watch Katie answer your questions live on Facebook Live, starting at 2:30 pm ET on October 11th. Her live Q&A session will unfold on Mogul's Facebook page.**

Hi - I'm Katie Couric.

Currently, I'm a Yahoo Global News Anchor. I've additionally anchored NBC's Today Show, the CBS Evening News and hosted my own talk show. And I'm a passionate cancer advocate and documentary film producer -  as well as an author. I wrote the New York Times bestseller, The Best Advice I Ever Got: Lessons From Extraordinary Lives. 

In 2014, I joined Yahoo as the Global News Anchor. I anchor reports on live world events, conduct groundbreaking interviews with major newsmakers and cultural figures, and examine the important issues of our time.

My documentary credits include Fed Up, which looks at the obesity epidemic, and Under the Gun, which traces the history of gun violence in America.

In September 2006, I made history by becoming the first woman at the helm of an evening news cast when I was named solo anchor of the CBS Evening News.

Some more information about me: I am the mom of two daughters, Ellie and Carrie. I love bacon. I can play piano by ear. And I was both Vice President and President of my student council. But my career in political aspirations ended there!

Now's your chance to ask me anything! Please write your questions in the comments section below and I'll answer the questions live on Tuesday, October 11th at 2:30 pm ET. You can also watch the interview unfold live on Facebook Live on Mogul's Facebook page.

It's all part of Mogul's new interactive Q &A series, Ask A Mogul Anything. 

Come on and ask me *anything* ... about pursuing broadcast journalism... producing documentaries... standing up to cancer ... balancing motherhood with career ... and so much more.


53 comments

  • Mandy Ree
    Mandy Ree Mogul Influencer, Disabilty Activist, Blogger at Legally Blind Bagged
    1y ago

    Hi Katie. I always admired your work as a news anchor. What was the most difficult story you had to cover and how did you keep your cool under such pressure?

    Hi Katie. I always admired your work as a news anchor. What was the most difficult story you had to cover and how did you keep your cool under such pressure?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      Well I've been doing this, Mandy, for a very long time. So I've had a lot of stories that have been difficult to cover. I think probably the hardest stories are when there's breaking news and it's a sad story involving a lot of human tragedy and loss. So, of course, 9/11 I think was one of the most challenging days of my life and career. In real time, everybody at NBC News, where I was at the time, we were learning what had unfolded, And the magnitude of the disaster was so enormous. We knew the magnitude in terms of the buildings, but we didn't know how that translated into loss of human life or who was responsible. So covering it in real time-- and trying to keep calm yourself, because, you know, like everyone who lives in New York, but also everyone who lives in the United States, and really around the world-- everybody was worried about their loved ones. They were worried about people, of course. They didn't know what this meant. And so that was a very, very stressful, nerve-racking day. And I had to stay calm and carry on, as they say. And really try to ascertain information I was getting to make sure it was accurate and reliable. And it was just breaking so, so quickly. I think that was probably the most changing story I've ever had to cover in my career. Other hard stories included the time I went to Columbine after the school shooting there in Littleton, Colorado. That was very difficult because I think any time you're interviewing people who are in the throes of grief and terrible loss, whose emotions are so intensely raw, it's very hard because I think you feel like a caretaker in addition to an interviewer. Because you don't wanna lose sight at all of your humanity and it's really-- you're there to help them stay collected enough that they can share their story. So that can be a very challenging and also gut-wrenching experience if you're a reporter and you're talking to people about a tremendous, personal loss.

      Well I've been doing this, Mandy, for a very long time. So I've had a lot of stories that have been difficult to cover. I think probably the hardest stories are when there's breaking news and it's a sad story involving a lot of human tragedy and loss. So, of course, 9/11 I think was one of the most challenging days of my life and career. In real time, everybody at NBC News, where I was at the time, we were learning what had unfolded, And the magnitude of the disaster was so enormous. We knew the magnitude in terms of the buildings, but we didn't know how that translated into loss of human life or who was responsible. So covering it in real time-- and trying to keep calm yourself, because, you know, like everyone who lives in New York, but also everyone who lives in the United States, and really around the world-- everybody was worried about their loved ones. They were worried about people, of course. They didn't know what this meant. And so that was a very, very stressful, nerve-racking day. And I had to stay calm and carry on, as they say. And really try to ascertain information I was getting to make sure it was accurate and reliable. And it was just breaking so, so quickly. I think that was probably the most changing story I've ever had to cover in my career. Other hard stories included the time I went to Columbine after the school shooting there in Littleton, Colorado. That was very difficult because I think any time you're interviewing people who are in the throes of grief and terrible loss, whose emotions are so intensely raw, it's very hard because I think you feel like a caretaker in addition to an interviewer. Because you don't wanna lose sight at all of your humanity and it's really-- you're there to help them stay collected enough that they can share their story. So that can be a very challenging and also gut-wrenching experience if you're a reporter and you're talking to people about a tremendous, personal loss.

  • aishahan
    1y ago

    Hi Katie. If you have any, how do you like to spend your free time? Do you have a hobby?

    Hi Katie. If you have any, how do you like to spend your free time? Do you have a hobby?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      You know, I like to play the piano. I love going to Broadway shows. I like going to movies. I saw The Girl on a Train last night. I thought Emily Blunt was really good. I play a little tennis. I try to exercise. I actually clean my house because I'm totally a slob. And so in my free time I have to make up for all the times that I've just put things somewhere. And I'm a bit of a hoarder. So I spend some of my time cleaning. And I like to talk to my friends. I have a lot of friends all the way from high school to people I've worked with through the years. And I think friendships take time and nurturing. And so I like to spend time on the phone talking to my friends. But I've fallen off the wagon a little bit on that. And I'm a Flywheel girl. (LAUGH) I know that the world is divided, not only politically but between Flywheel and Soul Cycle. My friend Ruth started Flywheel so I'm very loyal to her. But Soul Cycle's fun, too. My daughters are more Soul Cycle and I'm more Flywheel.

      You know, I like to play the piano. I love going to Broadway shows. I like going to movies. I saw The Girl on a Train last night. I thought Emily Blunt was really good. I play a little tennis. I try to exercise. I actually clean my house because I'm totally a slob. And so in my free time I have to make up for all the times that I've just put things somewhere. And I'm a bit of a hoarder. So I spend some of my time cleaning. And I like to talk to my friends. I have a lot of friends all the way from high school to people I've worked with through the years. And I think friendships take time and nurturing. And so I like to spend time on the phone talking to my friends. But I've fallen off the wagon a little bit on that. And I'm a Flywheel girl. (LAUGH) I know that the world is divided, not only politically but between Flywheel and Soul Cycle. My friend Ruth started Flywheel so I'm very loyal to her. But Soul Cycle's fun, too. My daughters are more Soul Cycle and I'm more Flywheel.

  • booklover423
    1y ago

    Hi Katie - So great to have you answering our questions. My question to you is - do you ever have moments of self doubt? Or did you along the way in building your career? And, if so, what did you do to push through it?

    Hi Katie - So great to have you answering our questions. My question to you is - do you ever have moments of self doubt? Or did you along the way in building your career? And, if so, what did you do to push through it?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      Every day I have moments of self-doubt. I think it's natural for us to all feel insecure and doubt ourselves and wonder if we did the right thing or, you know, did we ask the right questions or how do we conduct ourselves in a certain situation? And I think everyone has these nagging self doubts. But I think you just have to persevere and try to focus. Accentuate the positive and focus on what you're doing right versus what you're doing wrong. While acknowledging, you should kind of think about, "Well what could I have done better in the situation," or, "how could I-- improve the next time I'm faced with this?" But I think we all are insecure. I think the people who say they're not just are lying and I think that it's kind of keeping it in its proper place. And as I said, acknowledging it, learning from it, and then trying to push forward are key. And I'm very good at compartmentalizing as well, which I think has been extremely helpful for me, professionally and personally.

      Every day I have moments of self-doubt. I think it's natural for us to all feel insecure and doubt ourselves and wonder if we did the right thing or, you know, did we ask the right questions or how do we conduct ourselves in a certain situation? And I think everyone has these nagging self doubts. But I think you just have to persevere and try to focus. Accentuate the positive and focus on what you're doing right versus what you're doing wrong. While acknowledging, you should kind of think about, "Well what could I have done better in the situation," or, "how could I-- improve the next time I'm faced with this?" But I think we all are insecure. I think the people who say they're not just are lying and I think that it's kind of keeping it in its proper place. And as I said, acknowledging it, learning from it, and then trying to push forward are key. And I'm very good at compartmentalizing as well, which I think has been extremely helpful for me, professionally and personally.

  • Sally22
    1y ago

    Hi Katie - What's your approach to finding a work/life balance? How have you balanced the demands of family with career?

    Hi Katie - What's your approach to finding a work/life balance? How have you balanced the demands of family with career?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      Well, you know, it's funny. My work is my life and my life is my work. And having said that,, I think in some ways my work is my raison d'être. But I, of course, am very committed to my family. My daughters, I think, aspect the fact that I worked, that I was contributing out in the world, and I was trying to model behavior for them because they can do whatever they want. I'd like them to have a profession. I really believe it's very important for women to be independent financially and otherwise. You know, I hope that they have careers even if they drop out or decrease their workload if they wanna focus on their family a little bit more. But I've always really loved my work. And I think loving my work makes me a happier person in my life. When my girls were little, I think I had a little less on my mind now, because my kids are grown and one is in college and one is working. But I used to just sometimes calibrate where-- how I spent my time. And if I had a particularly demanding work schedule then at night I would make sure I didn't have plans socially. I think if anything suffered in the quote/unquote work/life balance it was sort of my social life. So-- you know, I really was happy working hard, putting in long hours. But then when I was home I really wanted to be home and focused on my kids. And I have the added pressure of, you know, since my husband died, trying to have kind of a social life and trying to have some adult company. And, you know, even a romantic life. That sounds so cheesy but you guys know what I mean. And so trying to balance all those things was really difficult. I sometimes I got it wrong. But I also believe that you have to, gonna get the recipe or the equation perfectly day in and day out. And sometimes you have to kind of forgive yourself and say, "I-- I maybe struck the wrong balance here. I'm gonna make up for it here." I don't think it's-- you know, I think it's a constantly dynamic and fluid opportunity to make your priorities each and every day. And if you didn't get it right one day, you can get it right the next. Yeah. You're so smart. See, work/life integration. I mean, I think the work/life balance thing is-- become so hackneyed also---and the whole concept of it. But it's just one more thing to feel guilty about. So, you know, I think-- I think there are ways as-- as I said, to calibrate it, and revisit it, and just, like, think about it. And-- if it doesn't feel right to you then probably you're spending too much time in-- well you probably won't feel bad about spending too much on your life. But you might actually. You might feel like your work is suffering. So I think-- it's something you kind of know in your gut.

      Well, you know, it's funny. My work is my life and my life is my work. And having said that,, I think in some ways my work is my raison d'être. But I, of course, am very committed to my family. My daughters, I think, aspect the fact that I worked, that I was contributing out in the world, and I was trying to model behavior for them because they can do whatever they want. I'd like them to have a profession. I really believe it's very important for women to be independent financially and otherwise. You know, I hope that they have careers even if they drop out or decrease their workload if they wanna focus on their family a little bit more. But I've always really loved my work. And I think loving my work makes me a happier person in my life. When my girls were little, I think I had a little less on my mind now, because my kids are grown and one is in college and one is working. But I used to just sometimes calibrate where-- how I spent my time. And if I had a particularly demanding work schedule then at night I would make sure I didn't have plans socially. I think if anything suffered in the quote/unquote work/life balance it was sort of my social life. So-- you know, I really was happy working hard, putting in long hours. But then when I was home I really wanted to be home and focused on my kids. And I have the added pressure of, you know, since my husband died, trying to have kind of a social life and trying to have some adult company. And, you know, even a romantic life. That sounds so cheesy but you guys know what I mean. And so trying to balance all those things was really difficult. I sometimes I got it wrong. But I also believe that you have to, gonna get the recipe or the equation perfectly day in and day out. And sometimes you have to kind of forgive yourself and say, "I-- I maybe struck the wrong balance here. I'm gonna make up for it here." I don't think it's-- you know, I think it's a constantly dynamic and fluid opportunity to make your priorities each and every day. And if you didn't get it right one day, you can get it right the next. Yeah. You're so smart. See, work/life integration. I mean, I think the work/life balance thing is-- become so hackneyed also---and the whole concept of it. But it's just one more thing to feel guilty about. So, you know, I think-- I think there are ways as-- as I said, to calibrate it, and revisit it, and just, like, think about it. And-- if it doesn't feel right to you then probably you're spending too much time in-- well you probably won't feel bad about spending too much on your life. But you might actually. You might feel like your work is suffering. So I think-- it's something you kind of know in your gut.

  • miranda444
    1y ago

    If you could meet your 13 year old self, what advice would you give her? And how about your 21 year old self?

    If you could meet your 13 year old self, what advice would you give her? And how about your 21 year old self?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      I think to my 13-year-old self I'd say, 'Don't sublimate your ambitions because you think it's not cool to be a strong, smart, ambitious person.' That goes for males or females. You know, when I was growing up, I think it was very typical (for girls to change their behavior in the classroom around boys). That's why single-sex education is something that I wanted my daughters to be involved in. And then in high school, they went to a co-ed school. But sometimes you start to retreat academically. I think in my era it was quite common for women to kind of take a backseat or for it not to seem "feminine" to have a really impressive, academic life. And so I think if I had to do it over again, I'd say to my 13-year-old self, "Focus. Focus on learning. Focus on your studies. Don't worry so much." I was one of those kids who wanted to be liked, who wanted to be popular. And sometimes I don't think that was necessarily something that went hand-in-hand with being academically-oriented. So that's what I would say to my 13-year-old self: "Really stay the course and learn, learn, learn. Take advantage of school and don't goof off. Don't procrastinate." I was an okay student but I didn't take advantage of what I was learning as much as I could have. To my 21-year-old self I would say, "Don't let the bastards get you down." (LAUGH) I think that there are a lot of naysayers who try to throw obstacles in your way who say, for whatever reason, "You don't fit the bill for what you are wanting to do." But I think that with perseverance and hard work, you can really achieve great things. Having said that, I also think it's important to take a good, honest look at your skills, what you're good at, and what you wanna do in the ven diagram of those two things coming together, what you love and what you're good at. Because you could love something and not be good at it. I think it's possible, as I said, with enough hard work and effort to become good at something - because I was terrible, terrible as a TV reporter when I started out. I mean, I was awful. (LAUGH) But I really do adhere to Malcolm Gladwell's claim that to be come good at anything it takes 10,000 hours. And I think, if after 10,000 hours you're still not good, you should find something else to do.

      I think to my 13-year-old self I'd say, 'Don't sublimate your ambitions because you think it's not cool to be a strong, smart, ambitious person.' That goes for males or females. You know, when I was growing up, I think it was very typical (for girls to change their behavior in the classroom around boys). That's why single-sex education is something that I wanted my daughters to be involved in. And then in high school, they went to a co-ed school. But sometimes you start to retreat academically. I think in my era it was quite common for women to kind of take a backseat or for it not to seem "feminine" to have a really impressive, academic life. And so I think if I had to do it over again, I'd say to my 13-year-old self, "Focus. Focus on learning. Focus on your studies. Don't worry so much." I was one of those kids who wanted to be liked, who wanted to be popular. And sometimes I don't think that was necessarily something that went hand-in-hand with being academically-oriented. So that's what I would say to my 13-year-old self: "Really stay the course and learn, learn, learn. Take advantage of school and don't goof off. Don't procrastinate." I was an okay student but I didn't take advantage of what I was learning as much as I could have. To my 21-year-old self I would say, "Don't let the bastards get you down." (LAUGH) I think that there are a lot of naysayers who try to throw obstacles in your way who say, for whatever reason, "You don't fit the bill for what you are wanting to do." But I think that with perseverance and hard work, you can really achieve great things. Having said that, I also think it's important to take a good, honest look at your skills, what you're good at, and what you wanna do in the ven diagram of those two things coming together, what you love and what you're good at. Because you could love something and not be good at it. I think it's possible, as I said, with enough hard work and effort to become good at something - because I was terrible, terrible as a TV reporter when I started out. I mean, I was awful. (LAUGH) But I really do adhere to Malcolm Gladwell's claim that to be come good at anything it takes 10,000 hours. And I think, if after 10,000 hours you're still not good, you should find something else to do.

  • glasshalffull100

    What has been the biggest lesson you've learned in terms of heartbreak?

    What has been the biggest lesson you've learned in terms of heartbreak?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      I've learned that we're all much more resilient than we could ever imagine. I've had my share of heartbreak and disappointments throughout my life and career. I often say this when I'm talking to people about grief, that Thomas Jefferson said, even though I think this had to do with government rather than life, that the earth is made for the living. And I think that when we have setbacks-- heartbreak--we just have to really dig deep and realize that we all have a limited amount of time here on the planet. And we have to make the most of it. When my husband died, I was 41. I grieved and grieved deeply. But I think he would not have wanted my life to end or to rob any kind of spirit and enjoyment out of life because he wasn't there to enjoy it with me. So I think you rely on your friends. I had great friends. I relied on my family. I'll never forget when my dad was-- Jay had to have some operation in this horrific nine-month period of time after he'd been diagnosed with stage four cancer. And I went into New York Hospital and there was my dad sitting right by the elevator. And it was so moving for me that he didn't tell me he was coming up from Virginia - He just showed up to be with me. So I feel very blessed that I had incredible parents and siblings and friends who really helped me get through this. So I would say to rely on your friends. And when they say, "What can we do for you?" - tell them. Because I think people say that but they don't really necessarily mean it or they don't know how to help. So I always say whenever anyone is suffering or they have a sick family member or, you know, you say to them, "Can I take your kids for a walk? Can I I go to the grocery store for you?" I mean, come up with really specific things you can do that would help them in their lives. And if you say, "Anything I can do, please tell me," you should mean it. And you should be willing to do those things that will make their life better in a really difficult time.

      I've learned that we're all much more resilient than we could ever imagine. I've had my share of heartbreak and disappointments throughout my life and career. I often say this when I'm talking to people about grief, that Thomas Jefferson said, even though I think this had to do with government rather than life, that the earth is made for the living. And I think that when we have setbacks-- heartbreak--we just have to really dig deep and realize that we all have a limited amount of time here on the planet. And we have to make the most of it. When my husband died, I was 41. I grieved and grieved deeply. But I think he would not have wanted my life to end or to rob any kind of spirit and enjoyment out of life because he wasn't there to enjoy it with me. So I think you rely on your friends. I had great friends. I relied on my family. I'll never forget when my dad was-- Jay had to have some operation in this horrific nine-month period of time after he'd been diagnosed with stage four cancer. And I went into New York Hospital and there was my dad sitting right by the elevator. And it was so moving for me that he didn't tell me he was coming up from Virginia - He just showed up to be with me. So I feel very blessed that I had incredible parents and siblings and friends who really helped me get through this. So I would say to rely on your friends. And when they say, "What can we do for you?" - tell them. Because I think people say that but they don't really necessarily mean it or they don't know how to help. So I always say whenever anyone is suffering or they have a sick family member or, you know, you say to them, "Can I take your kids for a walk? Can I I go to the grocery store for you?" I mean, come up with really specific things you can do that would help them in their lives. And if you say, "Anything I can do, please tell me," you should mean it. And you should be willing to do those things that will make their life better in a really difficult time.

  • EthanSingh
    1y ago

    Hi Katie, what inspired you to go into journalism and become a news anchor? What advice would you have for any aspiring journalists?

    Hi Katie, what inspired you to go into journalism and become a news anchor? What advice would you have for any aspiring journalists?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      My dad worked in newspapers and was a political reporter for the Atlanta Constitution. Before that, he worked for the Macon Telegraph (that's in Georgia, too). And he worked for United Press before it became UPI (United Press International). My dad was just a very brilliant, well-read, erudite person who could talk about anything, really-- just a variety of subjects with such authority and knowledge. And I think that I got my interest in writing and reporting from him. And I think he realized that I'm very outgoing. I think I got that more from my mom than my dad. And my mom gave me a sense of confidence, I think, from the unconditional love that she gave me that I could do anything. She was not stage-mothery mother, but instead she was very kind of --appropriately, I thought --ambitious for her kids. She had four children. So I think because of the combination of my interests in interacting with people and being able to write and tell stories-- I'm a fairly visual person - television appealed to me. But I also love words. So writing appealed to me. And I think that I've always had a lot of empathy. I hope that doesn't sound conceited. But ever since I was a little girl I think my emotional intelligence, my EQ, was always higher than my IQ. And I think I could really relate to people, understand kind of what they were going through and try to figure out how to help them through something. And so I think for all of those reasons, I chose a career that matched my skill set and my interests. And that's why I think I have been somewhat successful in what I've done. As for my advice for aspiring journalist? It's so different now than it was when I was coming up. There were three networks back in the day. And the audience share was much bigger. The internet, as you may have seen in the BMW commercial, which I did a couple years ago, I didn't even know what the internet was back in 1994. (LAUGH) You can revisit that online if you'd like. It was just a very, very different landscape. So what I tell young people who are interested in journalism is a couple of things: Journalism is a lot of different careers. It's a lot of different jobs within sort of the umbrella of journalism, so to speak. So I think you need to figure out what you like to do-- do you like to write, are you a visual person, would you like to do video? Ask yourself what sort of floats your boat. And then, I think it's important to keep in mind that there are so many outlets that you can do things on. You should look for mentors. Look for people whose style and values you feel kind of reflect yours, the kind of quality of the work that you want to do. And then just start bothering them, start submitting thing. And while you're doing all of that, you can start creating things for your friends and family, for your own network on Facebook. Because of social media, we have this opportunity to create that we never had before. In the past, you had to go to work for a local news station and you had to get your foot in the door. But now we have everything at our fingertips. So try to write if you're interested in writing. And start seeing if you can get interviews with people. Or write about subjects and give your take and your opinions sometimes. I think there are a lot of things that you can be doing while you're looking for the right place that is doing the kind of work you wish to do. Or a place that you feel would be a good environment for the kind of work you want to do.

      My dad worked in newspapers and was a political reporter for the Atlanta Constitution. Before that, he worked for the Macon Telegraph (that's in Georgia, too). And he worked for United Press before it became UPI (United Press International). My dad was just a very brilliant, well-read, erudite person who could talk about anything, really-- just a variety of subjects with such authority and knowledge. And I think that I got my interest in writing and reporting from him. And I think he realized that I'm very outgoing. I think I got that more from my mom than my dad. And my mom gave me a sense of confidence, I think, from the unconditional love that she gave me that I could do anything. She was not stage-mothery mother, but instead she was very kind of --appropriately, I thought --ambitious for her kids. She had four children. So I think because of the combination of my interests in interacting with people and being able to write and tell stories-- I'm a fairly visual person - television appealed to me. But I also love words. So writing appealed to me. And I think that I've always had a lot of empathy. I hope that doesn't sound conceited. But ever since I was a little girl I think my emotional intelligence, my EQ, was always higher than my IQ. And I think I could really relate to people, understand kind of what they were going through and try to figure out how to help them through something. And so I think for all of those reasons, I chose a career that matched my skill set and my interests. And that's why I think I have been somewhat successful in what I've done. As for my advice for aspiring journalist? It's so different now than it was when I was coming up. There were three networks back in the day. And the audience share was much bigger. The internet, as you may have seen in the BMW commercial, which I did a couple years ago, I didn't even know what the internet was back in 1994. (LAUGH) You can revisit that online if you'd like. It was just a very, very different landscape. So what I tell young people who are interested in journalism is a couple of things: Journalism is a lot of different careers. It's a lot of different jobs within sort of the umbrella of journalism, so to speak. So I think you need to figure out what you like to do-- do you like to write, are you a visual person, would you like to do video? Ask yourself what sort of floats your boat. And then, I think it's important to keep in mind that there are so many outlets that you can do things on. You should look for mentors. Look for people whose style and values you feel kind of reflect yours, the kind of quality of the work that you want to do. And then just start bothering them, start submitting thing. And while you're doing all of that, you can start creating things for your friends and family, for your own network on Facebook. Because of social media, we have this opportunity to create that we never had before. In the past, you had to go to work for a local news station and you had to get your foot in the door. But now we have everything at our fingertips. So try to write if you're interested in writing. And start seeing if you can get interviews with people. Or write about subjects and give your take and your opinions sometimes. I think there are a lot of things that you can be doing while you're looking for the right place that is doing the kind of work you wish to do. Or a place that you feel would be a good environment for the kind of work you want to do.

      • Katie Couric
        Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
        1y ago

        If you want to do something like interview a CEO, well maybe you won't be able to get to the CEO. But let's say you want to interview people in a whole host of professions. Maybe you contact LinkedIn and you say, "Hey, I've got these profiles, I think kids need to learn more, young people want to know more about a variety of professions. Would you be interested in running my things?" You know, there's a lot of stuff you could do. But I think you do have to be very persistent, and aggressive, and you have to network, and get your foot in the door, and come up with ideas and just not give up. You know, I have to hustle and I'm (LAUGH) 59 frickin' years old, people. And sometimes I'm like, "I am a little tired of hustling." But in this day and age, with so many choices and so many new platforms, you have to figure out well how can I work my stuff in there? The folks here who I work with at Yahoo are great about figuring that out. You can't really rest on your laurels because you can no longer expect people to come to you. You have to get out to people and you have to provide them with something that they can't really find anywhere else. When I interviewed Biz Stone for my advice book, he said something like-- "Find a need and fill it." So--be aware of -- "What would I like? What product would I like that isn't currently being created?" And then maybe take it from there.

        If you want to do something like interview a CEO, well maybe you won't be able to get to the CEO. But let's say you want to interview people in a whole host of professions. Maybe you contact LinkedIn and you say, "Hey, I've got these profiles, I think kids need to learn more, young people want to know more about a variety of professions. Would you be interested in running my things?" You know, there's a lot of stuff you could do. But I think you do have to be very persistent, and aggressive, and you have to network, and get your foot in the door, and come up with ideas and just not give up. You know, I have to hustle and I'm (LAUGH) 59 frickin' years old, people. And sometimes I'm like, "I am a little tired of hustling." But in this day and age, with so many choices and so many new platforms, you have to figure out well how can I work my stuff in there? The folks here who I work with at Yahoo are great about figuring that out. You can't really rest on your laurels because you can no longer expect people to come to you. You have to get out to people and you have to provide them with something that they can't really find anywhere else. When I interviewed Biz Stone for my advice book, he said something like-- "Find a need and fill it." So--be aware of -- "What would I like? What product would I like that isn't currently being created?" And then maybe take it from there.

  • Daniella Hobbs
    Daniella Hobbs Mogul Influencer
    1y ago

    Hi Katie. My name is Daniella, and I am currently a senior documentary studies and production major at Ithaca College. I take classes in film, photography, and journalism, but am leaning toward documentary film production as a career path. What is the #1 piece of advice you would give an aspiring documentary producer who is getting ready to graduate and go off into the "real world"?

    Hi Katie. My name is Daniella, and I am currently a senior documentary studies and production major at Ithaca College. I take classes in film, photography, and journalism, but am leaning toward documentary film production as a career path. What is the #1 piece of advice you would give an aspiring documentary producer who is getting ready to graduate and go off into the "real world"?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      I think you can do micro versus macro, or small versus big. You know, I was talking to my colleagues here and we were saying, 'Find documentaries you admire and people who are really tackling issues that you care about, see if you can do an internship, and see if you can really get your foot in the door in some of those places.' And then maybe get with like-minded people who are your age and team up with them. You can now use your phone. You can edit on your phone. And maybe start trying to produce some documentaries yourself and then take those documentaries and try to get them seen. And those will also help you if it comes to getting a job with a more established documentary/film maker like Alex Gibney, for example. Maria Cuomo Cole has done some great documentaries. And I think if you are persistent and you approach it, and you don't give up and you don't, like, email them once but instead really write a thoughtful letter and keep writing, you know, at some point you're going to make a connection. And someone's going to say, "Wow." I remember when I was at ABC News in Washington. I was 22 years old and I was a desk assistant, which meant I made coffee. I got Frank Reynolds, who was the anchor of World News Tonight, ham sandwiches. I xeroxed. I answered the phone. But one day I went up to-- a correspondent named Don Farmer, who did 20/20, and I had a whole list of story ideas that I thought would really be good for 20/20. Now I don't think he had many 22-year-old-- desk assistants going up to his office, knocking on his door and saying, "Here, I've written a sheet of story ideas and why I think they would be good." Well ultimately he ended up going to CNN and I ended up being his associate producer, producer and then a reporter for him on his show. So I think people want to hear from young people, they want to see that you've taken the initiative and that you're thinking and that you're taking advantage of these opportunities. I think people would be pleasantly surprised. You know, some people are not going to be that helpful. But I think a lot of other people would be really impressed and say, "Thank you. These are good ideas." Or, "Can you give me some more research on X, Y or Z." So, I think you really have to take advantage of opportunities. From Buzzfeed to PBS, there are a lot of great, great outlets. So I think you just to carpet-bomb the place with your resume while simultaneously honing your skills.

      I think you can do micro versus macro, or small versus big. You know, I was talking to my colleagues here and we were saying, 'Find documentaries you admire and people who are really tackling issues that you care about, see if you can do an internship, and see if you can really get your foot in the door in some of those places.' And then maybe get with like-minded people who are your age and team up with them. You can now use your phone. You can edit on your phone. And maybe start trying to produce some documentaries yourself and then take those documentaries and try to get them seen. And those will also help you if it comes to getting a job with a more established documentary/film maker like Alex Gibney, for example. Maria Cuomo Cole has done some great documentaries. And I think if you are persistent and you approach it, and you don't give up and you don't, like, email them once but instead really write a thoughtful letter and keep writing, you know, at some point you're going to make a connection. And someone's going to say, "Wow." I remember when I was at ABC News in Washington. I was 22 years old and I was a desk assistant, which meant I made coffee. I got Frank Reynolds, who was the anchor of World News Tonight, ham sandwiches. I xeroxed. I answered the phone. But one day I went up to-- a correspondent named Don Farmer, who did 20/20, and I had a whole list of story ideas that I thought would really be good for 20/20. Now I don't think he had many 22-year-old-- desk assistants going up to his office, knocking on his door and saying, "Here, I've written a sheet of story ideas and why I think they would be good." Well ultimately he ended up going to CNN and I ended up being his associate producer, producer and then a reporter for him on his show. So I think people want to hear from young people, they want to see that you've taken the initiative and that you're thinking and that you're taking advantage of these opportunities. I think people would be pleasantly surprised. You know, some people are not going to be that helpful. But I think a lot of other people would be really impressed and say, "Thank you. These are good ideas." Or, "Can you give me some more research on X, Y or Z." So, I think you really have to take advantage of opportunities. From Buzzfeed to PBS, there are a lot of great, great outlets. So I think you just to carpet-bomb the place with your resume while simultaneously honing your skills.

  • Eva Tucker
    Eva Tucker CEO of Centered Media
    1y ago

    Hi Katie. You are a mother and live a very full life. Do you get those "I don't know how you do it!" comments? How have you had to get comfortable with forging your own unique path in life that not everyone understands?

    Hi Katie. You are a mother and live a very full life. Do you get those "I don't know how you do it!" comments? How have you had to get comfortable with forging your own unique path in life that not everyone understands?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      I've never made apologies about wanting to have a career. Wanting to contribute. Using whatever talents I may have to contribute to the conversation or to have an impact in some way, shape, or form. Sometimes I feel uncomfortable that I don't do enough - wonder what could I be doing to help mentor young women more? What could I be doing to help those who aren't fortunate to have really great educations? How can I help take up the slack for people, you know, kids who are underserved in so many communities across the country, which I try to do some of but I don't think I do enough of? So I guess the answer to the question - I have a lot of energy. I have a lot of goals. And I have a lot of drive. And I'm very ambitious. I've never made apologies about that either. Ambitious to have a fulfilling career and life and to try to leave the world a little better off than it was when I got here. I don't know if I've done that. But it's something that is just part of my DNA, I think.

      I've never made apologies about wanting to have a career. Wanting to contribute. Using whatever talents I may have to contribute to the conversation or to have an impact in some way, shape, or form. Sometimes I feel uncomfortable that I don't do enough - wonder what could I be doing to help mentor young women more? What could I be doing to help those who aren't fortunate to have really great educations? How can I help take up the slack for people, you know, kids who are underserved in so many communities across the country, which I try to do some of but I don't think I do enough of? So I guess the answer to the question - I have a lot of energy. I have a lot of goals. And I have a lot of drive. And I'm very ambitious. I've never made apologies about that either. Ambitious to have a fulfilling career and life and to try to leave the world a little better off than it was when I got here. I don't know if I've done that. But it's something that is just part of my DNA, I think.

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  • NicoleRusso23
    1y ago

    Obviously, on air talent is an important skill to have to be an anchor, but off camera, what else is important, would you say? Also, is there any truth to the statement of "you have to be able to coil a mic wire, NBC tests you and if you fail you don't get hired."? Thanks Katie!

    Obviously, on air talent is an important skill to have to be an anchor, but off camera, what else is important, would you say? Also, is there any truth to the statement of "you have to be able to coil a mic wire, NBC tests you and if you fail you don't get hired."? Thanks Katie!

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      I have never heard you have to coil your mic wire. Although I think I know how to do it at this point. (LAUGH) I think a lot of the skills to be successful in news --television news, video news, print news, and really any profession-- are fairly universal. I think you have to be a good listener. You have to be a good collaborator. You have to give credit where credit is due. And I think simultaneously you can't blame people when things go wrong. You have to accept responsibility when you're culpable. And I think that it's just important to be thoughtful and approachable and to really care. You have to care about what you do, take pride in your work and want it to be good. You want it to serve a need. I think it's hard in this day and age because this sort of what's happening in our business, where getting clicks don't necessarily equate with serving the public. I think they're often at odds. So I think just caring that what you're doing matters is really important behind the scenes, too. And being fair and questioning your decisions and talking to people you respect are important. I have to do that often in my job. And I think sometimes you get it right and sometimes you don't. The best you can hope for is that you can learn from your mistakes. And I also think it's important to not rest on your laurels. Always look at what's happening, you know, what's happening in any particular field. You need to be well-read and try to stay on top of things without being too over-reactive and knee-jerky about it, without saying, "Oh they're doing this way." I also think sometimes it's important to take a step back. And I think that means not being attached or tethered to your devices all the time. I'm a big proponent of unplugging, even though my husband will be laughing (LAUGH) when he hears this. There are studies that show that the part of your brain responsible for creativity is actually fired up when you're not stimulated by outside things. That's why all your good ideas come to you in the shower. At least they do for me (LAUGH) Probably because my showers are too long, too. (LAUGH) I think you have to every once in a while step a step back and kind of think about the big picture rather than getting so sucked into your daily duties.

      I have never heard you have to coil your mic wire. Although I think I know how to do it at this point. (LAUGH) I think a lot of the skills to be successful in news --television news, video news, print news, and really any profession-- are fairly universal. I think you have to be a good listener. You have to be a good collaborator. You have to give credit where credit is due. And I think simultaneously you can't blame people when things go wrong. You have to accept responsibility when you're culpable. And I think that it's just important to be thoughtful and approachable and to really care. You have to care about what you do, take pride in your work and want it to be good. You want it to serve a need. I think it's hard in this day and age because this sort of what's happening in our business, where getting clicks don't necessarily equate with serving the public. I think they're often at odds. So I think just caring that what you're doing matters is really important behind the scenes, too. And being fair and questioning your decisions and talking to people you respect are important. I have to do that often in my job. And I think sometimes you get it right and sometimes you don't. The best you can hope for is that you can learn from your mistakes. And I also think it's important to not rest on your laurels. Always look at what's happening, you know, what's happening in any particular field. You need to be well-read and try to stay on top of things without being too over-reactive and knee-jerky about it, without saying, "Oh they're doing this way." I also think sometimes it's important to take a step back. And I think that means not being attached or tethered to your devices all the time. I'm a big proponent of unplugging, even though my husband will be laughing (LAUGH) when he hears this. There are studies that show that the part of your brain responsible for creativity is actually fired up when you're not stimulated by outside things. That's why all your good ideas come to you in the shower. At least they do for me (LAUGH) Probably because my showers are too long, too. (LAUGH) I think you have to every once in a while step a step back and kind of think about the big picture rather than getting so sucked into your daily duties.

  • Ufaq Tahir Tramboo

    Hi Katie! Journalism today is very different from what it was a decade ago. However, the representation of Muslims in the media has been routinely stereotyped. Do you believe there is a need to adopt certain changes for conflict reporting and issues related to Muslims, in order to counter Islamophobia? Thanks!

    Hi Katie! Journalism today is very different from what it was a decade ago. However, the representation of Muslims in the media has been routinely stereotyped. Do you believe there is a need to adopt certain changes for conflict reporting and issues related to Muslims, in order to counter Islamophobia? Thanks!

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      I can't tell you how important I think that is. It's something that I have tried to do because I think these stereotypes unfortunately get reinforced in mass media. And it's critically important for us to counter those misconceptions, misperceptions or false images of an entire religion. I remember actually when I did a digital interview show for CBS back in, I think it was, 2008 or '09. I was a little ahead of my time. And I interviewed some actors who were in a Canadian show called Little Mosque on The Prairie. And I said to them, "I think we need the equivalent of a Cosby show for Muslims." This was prior to Bill Cosby's troubles. And I remember saying that because I thought Muslims-Americans, Muslims everywhere often have the same hope and dreams as everybody else. And I thought people don't understand things they're not familiar with. And if they were exposed to a Muslim family dealing with the same things we all deal with on a daily basis, it would be so helpful. You can not imagine the Islamophobic comments that greeted me when I landed. I was taking a vacation and the plane landed and I was like, "Oh my God. I can't even believe it." But it hasn't stopped me from interviewing people like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and just reminding people you about how wrong this is and against American values this is. I think that any time I can try to provide insight -- for example, there's so much conversation about Syrian refugees coming into the United States. We thought it was important at Yahoo! to talk to somebody who is involved in the vetting process so people could truly understand that it take 18 months to two years for any refugee to be allowed to come into this country before they're processed. And I think sometimes people don't understand that. So I think sometimes information itself can be extraordinarily powerful. And it's up to us as journalists to make sure people are properly informed and that they actually know the truth-- and the facts of the situation.

      I can't tell you how important I think that is. It's something that I have tried to do because I think these stereotypes unfortunately get reinforced in mass media. And it's critically important for us to counter those misconceptions, misperceptions or false images of an entire religion. I remember actually when I did a digital interview show for CBS back in, I think it was, 2008 or '09. I was a little ahead of my time. And I interviewed some actors who were in a Canadian show called Little Mosque on The Prairie. And I said to them, "I think we need the equivalent of a Cosby show for Muslims." This was prior to Bill Cosby's troubles. And I remember saying that because I thought Muslims-Americans, Muslims everywhere often have the same hope and dreams as everybody else. And I thought people don't understand things they're not familiar with. And if they were exposed to a Muslim family dealing with the same things we all deal with on a daily basis, it would be so helpful. You can not imagine the Islamophobic comments that greeted me when I landed. I was taking a vacation and the plane landed and I was like, "Oh my God. I can't even believe it." But it hasn't stopped me from interviewing people like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and just reminding people you about how wrong this is and against American values this is. I think that any time I can try to provide insight -- for example, there's so much conversation about Syrian refugees coming into the United States. We thought it was important at Yahoo! to talk to somebody who is involved in the vetting process so people could truly understand that it take 18 months to two years for any refugee to be allowed to come into this country before they're processed. And I think sometimes people don't understand that. So I think sometimes information itself can be extraordinarily powerful. And it's up to us as journalists to make sure people are properly informed and that they actually know the truth-- and the facts of the situation.

  • sasp_DC
    1y ago

    How do you think the Washington Post's, and not NBC News', release of the Trump tapes will damage NBC News' credibility (recognizing that Access Hollywood found the tape). Under the circumstances, how could they sit on that story for four days? I prefer to read or listen to the news - like many in my demographic (30-39) - what role do you see television journalism playing in the future with so few young-ish viewers?

    How do you think the Washington Post's, and not NBC News', release of the Trump tapes will damage NBC News' credibility (recognizing that Access Hollywood found the tape). Under the circumstances, how could they sit on that story for four days? I prefer to read or listen to the news - like many in my demographic (30-39) - what role do you see television journalism playing in the future with so few young-ish viewers?

  • kevin
    1y ago

    Hey Katie! What was the biggest obstacle in your career path and how did you overcome it? Thanks!

    Hey Katie! What was the biggest obstacle in your career path and how did you overcome it? Thanks!

  • Natasha
    Natasha 💪🏻& 👊🏻 just like NYC
    1y ago

    Hi Katie, what is your advice for other women trailblazers and to what or to whom do you credit your success to?

    Hi Katie, what is your advice for other women trailblazers and to what or to whom do you credit your success to?

  • tayloramead
    tayloramead Editorial Fellow at MAKERS.com, Aspiring Journalist, & Women's Advocate
    1y ago

    Hi Katie! I am an aspiring journalist working as an editorial fellow for AOL's MAKERS, so it is so nice to be able to ask you a question as you are one of our beloved MAKERS. That being said, on your way to success you faced a lot of criticism and hardship, but kept pushing forward and creating an inspiring path for other women and girls to follow. What advice would you give to your daughters and other ambitious girls so they can overcome any similar obstacles they may face due to their gender? Is there one piece of advice you wish you had learned earlier in your career that you would pass on to them? Thank you!

    Hi Katie! I am an aspiring journalist working as an editorial fellow for AOL's MAKERS, so it is so nice to be able to ask you a question as you are one of our beloved MAKERS. That being said, on your way to success you faced a lot of criticism and hardship, but kept pushing forward and creating an inspiring path for other women and girls to follow. What advice would you give to your daughters and other ambitious girls so they can overcome any similar obstacles they may face due to their gender? Is there one piece of advice you wish you had learned earlier in your career that you would pass on to them? Thank you!

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      First of all, thank you. My friend created the whole Maker's series----and I'm honored to be a part of it. She's great. I think everybody who puts themselves out there-- nobody escapes without criticism or people trashing them. And I think if you don't stand for anything, you stand for nothing. And then you really don't make a difference in the world. Not everybody's going to like you, which was a hard lesson for me to learn. I've always cared about being liked and being popular and all that stuff that I think we're programmed to really, really care about when we're coming up in the world. And I think it's also amplified because it's kind of my personality and my nature. So I think you can't really pay that much attention to the critics. I think when it's constructive criticism-- there is something to learn from it, you should totally process it and learn from it. I can't remember the whole Teddy Roosevelt speech. But I often read it, especially in times where I think I'm being criticized. You know, if you are out there and you're playin' the game you have to know, that means sometimes there's an injury----and I think that it's just part of it. I hope that my skin is never so thick that I grow completely desensitized to it. Because I think that's what gives me my humanity and allows me to be a sensitive and caring person. But I think you just have to put it in perspective and focus on all the positive things that you're able to accomplish. And go in knowing that you're not ever going to please everyone. If you do manage to please everyone - I think it's because you don't really stand for anything.

      First of all, thank you. My friend created the whole Maker's series----and I'm honored to be a part of it. She's great. I think everybody who puts themselves out there-- nobody escapes without criticism or people trashing them. And I think if you don't stand for anything, you stand for nothing. And then you really don't make a difference in the world. Not everybody's going to like you, which was a hard lesson for me to learn. I've always cared about being liked and being popular and all that stuff that I think we're programmed to really, really care about when we're coming up in the world. And I think it's also amplified because it's kind of my personality and my nature. So I think you can't really pay that much attention to the critics. I think when it's constructive criticism-- there is something to learn from it, you should totally process it and learn from it. I can't remember the whole Teddy Roosevelt speech. But I often read it, especially in times where I think I'm being criticized. You know, if you are out there and you're playin' the game you have to know, that means sometimes there's an injury----and I think that it's just part of it. I hope that my skin is never so thick that I grow completely desensitized to it. Because I think that's what gives me my humanity and allows me to be a sensitive and caring person. But I think you just have to put it in perspective and focus on all the positive things that you're able to accomplish. And go in knowing that you're not ever going to please everyone. If you do manage to please everyone - I think it's because you don't really stand for anything.

  • Sarah Fein
    [deleted]
    1y ago

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  • Amy M. 23
    1y ago

    What is your opinion on this entire election? The way candidates have run their campaigns and the way the media have covered them - how do you predict this will affect future presidential elections and how campaigns are run/covered?

    What is your opinion on this entire election? The way candidates have run their campaigns and the way the media have covered them - how do you predict this will affect future presidential elections and how campaigns are run/covered?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      That's a very big, dense, meaty question. I'll try to answer it without going into a two-hour dissertation. I'm sickened by this election and how coarse the discourse has become. It makes me sad. It makes me really upset about the state of the country. It gives me great anxiety. In a weird way, I feel like social media has contributed to the coarseness of the discourse because everyone is able to say what they want, insult people, be cruel, be nasty be outrageous. They're often rewarded for being outrageous. And that has somehow seeped into the national dialogue in some ways. So I hope we'll take a time-out after this election--and really start to think about how we conduct ourselves in civil society and if we want civil discourse to be an oxymoron or if we want to return to a time where we treated people with respect. I mean, people can disagree on a lot of things. But, I think the climate has become so charged and so disrespectful it makes me sad. It's worth noting that the media is not a monolith. People think the media is like Oz or something. And I think some-- some organizations have equipped themselves well and others have not done as good a job. I'm not going to name names. But I do think in this increasingly competitive environment, people are rewarded for ratings. And sometimes just because something is doing well in terms of ratings and people are watching it and staying engaged and can't turn away, doesn't mean it's actually right for the public. And I think the job of journalists is to really make these judgment calls and determinations on what should and shouldn't be allowed. And so I think there's going to be a lot of soul-searching and discussions after this campaign about, "Was the media collectively too willing to hand over their precious air time to--" you know, "one candidate in particular?" And were they willing to bend the rules for one candidate in particular because otherwise they wouldn't have a competitive edge? Or be a part of the competition if they didn't do phone interviews, for example? The fastest way to lose access to any individual is to ask tough questions - and to make them uncomfortable. You know, they say a journalist's job is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. And I think that as a result-- you could only go so far. People in this election put up with some conditions that a lot of people never would have tolerated (in years past). And I think that Donald Trump has made himself exceedingly available to the media and Hillary Clinton has made herself exceedingly unavailable. And I think probably the right balance in somewhere in the middle.. I think in this day and age people can talk directly to voters. So I think it's smart to use social media in some cases. So that's a good thing. But I think there is still a really important role for a prepared journalist who understands the issues, to have a forum with candidates, and hold their feet to the fire and make them answer tough questions.

      That's a very big, dense, meaty question. I'll try to answer it without going into a two-hour dissertation. I'm sickened by this election and how coarse the discourse has become. It makes me sad. It makes me really upset about the state of the country. It gives me great anxiety. In a weird way, I feel like social media has contributed to the coarseness of the discourse because everyone is able to say what they want, insult people, be cruel, be nasty be outrageous. They're often rewarded for being outrageous. And that has somehow seeped into the national dialogue in some ways. So I hope we'll take a time-out after this election--and really start to think about how we conduct ourselves in civil society and if we want civil discourse to be an oxymoron or if we want to return to a time where we treated people with respect. I mean, people can disagree on a lot of things. But, I think the climate has become so charged and so disrespectful it makes me sad. It's worth noting that the media is not a monolith. People think the media is like Oz or something. And I think some-- some organizations have equipped themselves well and others have not done as good a job. I'm not going to name names. But I do think in this increasingly competitive environment, people are rewarded for ratings. And sometimes just because something is doing well in terms of ratings and people are watching it and staying engaged and can't turn away, doesn't mean it's actually right for the public. And I think the job of journalists is to really make these judgment calls and determinations on what should and shouldn't be allowed. And so I think there's going to be a lot of soul-searching and discussions after this campaign about, "Was the media collectively too willing to hand over their precious air time to--" you know, "one candidate in particular?" And were they willing to bend the rules for one candidate in particular because otherwise they wouldn't have a competitive edge? Or be a part of the competition if they didn't do phone interviews, for example? The fastest way to lose access to any individual is to ask tough questions - and to make them uncomfortable. You know, they say a journalist's job is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. And I think that as a result-- you could only go so far. People in this election put up with some conditions that a lot of people never would have tolerated (in years past). And I think that Donald Trump has made himself exceedingly available to the media and Hillary Clinton has made herself exceedingly unavailable. And I think probably the right balance in somewhere in the middle.. I think in this day and age people can talk directly to voters. So I think it's smart to use social media in some cases. So that's a good thing. But I think there is still a really important role for a prepared journalist who understands the issues, to have a forum with candidates, and hold their feet to the fire and make them answer tough questions.

  • Diana Tomlin
    1y ago

    I am such a fan and admire your strength and courage. Not only do I think you are the best broadcast journalist in the field, but I greatly admire that you are an activist to raise awareness about cancer. How would you say your past experiences, particularly the difficult moments, have shaped and changed you as an individual?

    I am such a fan and admire your strength and courage. Not only do I think you are the best broadcast journalist in the field, but I greatly admire that you are an activist to raise awareness about cancer. How would you say your past experiences, particularly the difficult moments, have shaped and changed you as an individual?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      Muhammad Ali said, "Service is the rent you pay for your time on-- here on earth." When I started my work -- having a more high-profile job, I got asked to do all these different events. Dinners and emceeing and hosting lunches and supporting a lot of very, very worthy causes. But I think I didn't feel particularly connected to any of them because I hadn't experienced some of the things that the causes had been sort of established to face. So when my husband died of colon cancer when he was 42, and my sister Emily died of pancreatic cancer a few years later-- it really gave me a cause I cared deeply about, that I connected with on such a visceral, emotional level, that I wanted to pour my heart and soul into this. And I think my life has been so traumatized by these experiences, and yet so enriched by trying to turn these horrible losses into something positive or something that I could channel my energies into. I started by raising awareness about colon cancer-- screening and also raising funds for colon cancer, which is the second-leading cancer killer of men and women combined. But it was one of those cancers people just didn't really talk about. So I did that. I found it very gratifying. I still have people emailing me or writing me and saying that they were screened and they think it saved their lives. To be able to have that kind of impact in the world was incredible. And then I wanted to help all kinds of cancers. I felt I was being kind of greedy about colons. And that's when I joined forces with eight remarkable women and started Stand Up To Cancer, which I do think is the embodiment of the Margaret Mead quote, "Never doubt the power of a few determined, committed citizens to change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." I almost got that right, but not exactly. We have raised $500 million for cancer scientists who are collaborating in dream teams so that they can make progress faster in a whole host of cancers. And on a whole variety of approaches. It's just amazing. And every time we have that event every two years I look at it. I look at the stars that show up. I look at the corporations and the every-day people who are supporting the work and think, "Wow," like, "look what we built from absolutely nothing." And I think very few things, except for maybe your children, give you that sense of accomplishment and the sense that just through sheer determination, and hard work, and collaboration, we were able to establish this extraordinary organization. It's already helping people. We have two FDA-approved drugs. And there are so many exciting things going on in cancer research. We're at such an inflection point with technology and data, basic biology and science and our understanding of genes and cells and epileptics and all these exciting things-- it's a confluence of things coming together. My fervent hope and prayer is that all this that we're doing is going to help so many people. And if someone's husband is diagnosed with stage four colon cancer in the future when they're 41 years old that hopefully, they'll be able to manage the disease through some of the progress that Stand Up and all cancer researchers are making and hopefully even be cured of the disease all together.

      Muhammad Ali said, "Service is the rent you pay for your time on-- here on earth." When I started my work -- having a more high-profile job, I got asked to do all these different events. Dinners and emceeing and hosting lunches and supporting a lot of very, very worthy causes. But I think I didn't feel particularly connected to any of them because I hadn't experienced some of the things that the causes had been sort of established to face. So when my husband died of colon cancer when he was 42, and my sister Emily died of pancreatic cancer a few years later-- it really gave me a cause I cared deeply about, that I connected with on such a visceral, emotional level, that I wanted to pour my heart and soul into this. And I think my life has been so traumatized by these experiences, and yet so enriched by trying to turn these horrible losses into something positive or something that I could channel my energies into. I started by raising awareness about colon cancer-- screening and also raising funds for colon cancer, which is the second-leading cancer killer of men and women combined. But it was one of those cancers people just didn't really talk about. So I did that. I found it very gratifying. I still have people emailing me or writing me and saying that they were screened and they think it saved their lives. To be able to have that kind of impact in the world was incredible. And then I wanted to help all kinds of cancers. I felt I was being kind of greedy about colons. And that's when I joined forces with eight remarkable women and started Stand Up To Cancer, which I do think is the embodiment of the Margaret Mead quote, "Never doubt the power of a few determined, committed citizens to change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." I almost got that right, but not exactly. We have raised $500 million for cancer scientists who are collaborating in dream teams so that they can make progress faster in a whole host of cancers. And on a whole variety of approaches. It's just amazing. And every time we have that event every two years I look at it. I look at the stars that show up. I look at the corporations and the every-day people who are supporting the work and think, "Wow," like, "look what we built from absolutely nothing." And I think very few things, except for maybe your children, give you that sense of accomplishment and the sense that just through sheer determination, and hard work, and collaboration, we were able to establish this extraordinary organization. It's already helping people. We have two FDA-approved drugs. And there are so many exciting things going on in cancer research. We're at such an inflection point with technology and data, basic biology and science and our understanding of genes and cells and epileptics and all these exciting things-- it's a confluence of things coming together. My fervent hope and prayer is that all this that we're doing is going to help so many people. And if someone's husband is diagnosed with stage four colon cancer in the future when they're 41 years old that hopefully, they'll be able to manage the disease through some of the progress that Stand Up and all cancer researchers are making and hopefully even be cured of the disease all together.

  • Felicia Sabartinelli
    Felicia Sabartinelli Writer | Poet | Actress | Artist | Non-Profit Admin | Marketing | Sprinkle Addict
    1y ago

    Hi Katie! Something that has always fascinated me about journalism is having to often times cover topics that don't resonate with your own personal feelings, or go against your own beliefs. And I am wondering, what has been your most difficult interview to cover and why?

    Hi Katie! Something that has always fascinated me about journalism is having to often times cover topics that don't resonate with your own personal feelings, or go against your own beliefs. And I am wondering, what has been your most difficult interview to cover and why?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      I think that's where my empathy has helped me. First of all, I think it depends on the issue. But you try to play devil's advocate no matter who you're talking to, If there's-- a position you can take that is as a contrary. In some cases, you can't. But I think you try to understand where that person is coming from. So you appreciate their point of view even if you may, in fact, disagree with it. And I think that those kinds of conversations are what we need to have more of. I think in this current media environment we have our own views reflected back at us. A friend of mine who's very smart said, "People are searching for affirmation not information." And we need to be exposed to people who have different backgrounds than we do, different socioeconomic statuses. and different points of view, different life experiences. And I think that we live in these little echo chambers of like-minded individuals and that's why we need to get out of those echo chambers. I've had to cover a lot of controversial subjects. I try to just listen and hear people out. And I also do try to challenge them-- when, you know, there's something that I think is worth challenging. It's a fine balance because I think it's important to be respectful. On the other hand, I think it's important to listen and do follow-up questions as well. We don't have enough of that. And so I try to tread that fine line whenever I can.

      I think that's where my empathy has helped me. First of all, I think it depends on the issue. But you try to play devil's advocate no matter who you're talking to, If there's-- a position you can take that is as a contrary. In some cases, you can't. But I think you try to understand where that person is coming from. So you appreciate their point of view even if you may, in fact, disagree with it. And I think that those kinds of conversations are what we need to have more of. I think in this current media environment we have our own views reflected back at us. A friend of mine who's very smart said, "People are searching for affirmation not information." And we need to be exposed to people who have different backgrounds than we do, different socioeconomic statuses. and different points of view, different life experiences. And I think that we live in these little echo chambers of like-minded individuals and that's why we need to get out of those echo chambers. I've had to cover a lot of controversial subjects. I try to just listen and hear people out. And I also do try to challenge them-- when, you know, there's something that I think is worth challenging. It's a fine balance because I think it's important to be respectful. On the other hand, I think it's important to listen and do follow-up questions as well. We don't have enough of that. And so I try to tread that fine line whenever I can.

  • Paige Knapp
    1y ago

    Hi Katie! As a public relations professional, I know that the relationship between PR and journalism can be nuanced. How much of what you covered in your career came from a pitch, and how much was simply organic?

    Hi Katie! As a public relations professional, I know that the relationship between PR and journalism can be nuanced. How much of what you covered in your career came from a pitch, and how much was simply organic?

    • Katie Couric
      Katie Couric Yahoo Global News Anchor
      1y ago

      I think both. I have a lot of story ideas that come from articles I've read or things that have made me think about something in a different way. I read a lot. So a lot of times I get story ideas from articles. But I think I've often talked to PR professionals and have told them that-- you don't really wanna spoon-feed a news organization a story. But sometimes it's helpful to say, you know, "We can connect you with an organization that can help you." Because I think sometimes people get overwhelmed. Sometimes they get a little lazy, like they do in any profession. And if you're approaching them with a good story and a kind of interesting angle for a story, or something that they haven't thought about, if you go the extra mile and one step further and say, you know, "There's this organization here. They'd be willing to help you" or, "I can put you in contact with people who might be able to shed some light on the story, happy to do that," in other words, do a little of their work for them, I think that can sometimes be really effective. But I think you don't want to do something that's blatantly promoting a brand or an organization. In some cases it's okay to do that if you think it's worthy. I think that you have to figure out the best approach for the best asset and the best outlet and to find out who within that organization may really care about this issue. So you have to do your homework, I think, before you approach people with ideas. A lot of people will want to do stories that are pitches if you pitch them in the right way and if they don't sound "too pitchy", as Randy would say on American Idol.

      I think both. I have a lot of story ideas that come from articles I've read or things that have made me think about something in a different way. I read a lot. So a lot of times I get story ideas from articles. But I think I've often talked to PR professionals and have told them that-- you don't really wanna spoon-feed a news organization a story. But sometimes it's helpful to say, you know, "We can connect you with an organization that can help you." Because I think sometimes people get overwhelmed. Sometimes they get a little lazy, like they do in any profession. And if you're approaching them with a good story and a kind of interesting angle for a story, or something that they haven't thought about, if you go the extra mile and one step further and say, you know, "There's this organization here. They'd be willing to help you" or, "I can put you in contact with people who might be able to shed some light on the story, happy to do that," in other words, do a little of their work for them, I think that can sometimes be really effective. But I think you don't want to do something that's blatantly promoting a brand or an organization. In some cases it's okay to do that if you think it's worthy. I think that you have to figure out the best approach for the best asset and the best outlet and to find out who within that organization may really care about this issue. So you have to do your homework, I think, before you approach people with ideas. A lot of people will want to do stories that are pitches if you pitch them in the right way and if they don't sound "too pitchy", as Randy would say on American Idol.

  • Paige Knapp
    1y ago

    How do juggle personal and professional life without sacrificing one for the other? I am slowly realizing how difficult that is to do!

    How do juggle personal and professional life without sacrificing one for the other? I am slowly realizing how difficult that is to do!

  • aishahan
    [deleted]
    1y ago

    [deleted]

    [deleted]

  • Maddy Bernstein

    Hi Katie, You are such an inspiration and I have looked up to you for a long time. What is your advice to those who want to study broadcast journalism? How is the industry changing and what can students do to best prepare themselves for these shifts?

    Hi Katie, You are such an inspiration and I have looked up to you for a long time. What is your advice to those who want to study broadcast journalism? How is the industry changing and what can students do to best prepare themselves for these shifts?

  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    1y ago

    Hi Katie, it's such an honor to have you here on Mogul! What are the top tips you'd give to someone conducting an interview?

    Hi Katie, it's such an honor to have you here on Mogul! What are the top tips you'd give to someone conducting an interview?

  • Kelly Hudson
    1y ago

    Are women treated as fair as men in the journalism world? Has there ever been a time where you felt mistreated and how did you handle the situation?

    Are women treated as fair as men in the journalism world? Has there ever been a time where you felt mistreated and how did you handle the situation?

  • Kelly Hudson
    1y ago

    And if you hadn't been a journalist, what other career path do you think you would have taken?

    And if you hadn't been a journalist, what other career path do you think you would have taken?

  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    1y ago

    Do you enjoy being a public figure? What are the pros and cons of being a celebrity in the modern world, especially with the internet and how there's such an access to information?

    Do you enjoy being a public figure? What are the pros and cons of being a celebrity in the modern world, especially with the internet and how there's such an access to information?

  • Leigh Miller
    1y ago

    Thank you for your work. The Today Show meant so much to me growing up and was such a huge part of my childhood. Do you ever look back on your career and have 'pinch me' moments?

    Thank you for your work. The Today Show meant so much to me growing up and was such a huge part of my childhood. Do you ever look back on your career and have 'pinch me' moments?

  • Leigh Miller
    1y ago

    As sad as it is, I still remember the clip of you and Matt learning about the towers with 9/11. It was weird to see that clip in the 9/11 museum that's so powerful. Can you talk about what it was like that day and during that time to cover such a life-changing event?

    As sad as it is, I still remember the clip of you and Matt learning about the towers with 9/11. It was weird to see that clip in the 9/11 museum that's so powerful. Can you talk about what it was like that day and during that time to cover such a life-changing event?

  • tishita
    1y ago

    What would you see as the future of media?

    What would you see as the future of media?

  • VivianaVizcaino
    VivianaVizcaino Viviana
    1y ago

    Hi Katie it is so amazing that you're a talented pianist. Do you feel that it was difficult to choose between a career in journalism and trying to continue with the arts professionally? Did you ever feel you weren't making enough time to play music as often as you may have liked? How have you kept music in your life with all of the other work and projects you've taken on as an anchor, producer, and mother?

    Hi Katie it is so amazing that you're a talented pianist. Do you feel that it was difficult to choose between a career in journalism and trying to continue with the arts professionally? Did you ever feel you weren't making enough time to play music as often as you may have liked? How have you kept music in your life with all of the other work and projects you've taken on as an anchor, producer, and mother?

  • MaryPflumPeterson

    Hi Katie - Such an honor to have you join us for Ask A Mogul Anything. Every journalist has those stories that stays with him/her - either because they were so much fun, or because they really moved you. What are the stories and interviews that stay with you, that you continue to think about, years later? Also wondering if there is an interview you always wanted to get - may still want to get - but just haven't gotten yet?

    Hi Katie - Such an honor to have you join us for Ask A Mogul Anything. Every journalist has those stories that stays with him/her - either because they were so much fun, or because they really moved you. What are the stories and interviews that stay with you, that you continue to think about, years later? Also wondering if there is an interview you always wanted to get - may still want to get - but just haven't gotten yet?

  • Daniella Hobbs
    [deleted]
    1y ago

    [deleted]

    [deleted]

  • Jamie Berube
    Jamie Berube Freelance Writer/ Journalist.
    1y ago

    Any advice for an aspiring writer that is fresh and perhaps something not often articulated about gaining success in the writing world?

    Any advice for an aspiring writer that is fresh and perhaps something not often articulated about gaining success in the writing world?

  • William Merrick

    Hello Katie. To frame my question, I'll say that I see civilization and the resulting cultures as an immense conversation. As a leader in mass communication, I would venture to guess that you get to see cultures from a perspective few of us can appreciate. As a young white male, I often find myself in a precarious place when joining the discussion about our culture - and while this doesn't stand in my way, I know it causes many of my peers to disconnect. Are there specific values men you have worked with in the past have displayed that would stand out as positive, and how can the "young Katie Courics" out there help men stay involved in the dialogue?

    Hello Katie. To frame my question, I'll say that I see civilization and the resulting cultures as an immense conversation. As a leader in mass communication, I would venture to guess that you get to see cultures from a perspective few of us can appreciate. As a young white male, I often find myself in a precarious place when joining the discussion about our culture - and while this doesn't stand in my way, I know it causes many of my peers to disconnect. Are there specific values men you have worked with in the past have displayed that would stand out as positive, and how can the "young Katie Courics" out there help men stay involved in the dialogue?

    • William Merrick

      Also, how do you think this dialogue is going? The current election aside, what is Katie Couric's cultural forecast?

      Also, how do you think this dialogue is going? The current election aside, what is Katie Couric's cultural forecast?

  • Melissa Herb
    Melissa Herb Certified Transitional Wellness Coach
    1y ago

    Hello Katie, I've always loved you as a news anchor. What are the most inspiring stories you've covered during your career? <3

    Hello Katie, I've always loved you as a news anchor. What are the most inspiring stories you've covered during your career? <3

  • Jillian McCarten 80

    What are some techniques you use to decompress, destress, and keep yourself grounded. Thank you! It's great to have you on here

    What are some techniques you use to decompress, destress, and keep yourself grounded. Thank you! It's great to have you on here

  • Mia Andrea
    Mia Andrea Mogul influencer
    1y ago

    Do you need a volunteer in Scandinavia? Namaste.

    Do you need a volunteer in Scandinavia? Namaste.


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Katie Couric
Yahoo Global News Anchor

Katie Couric (@katiecouric), Yahoo Global News Anchor, is an award-winning journalist and TV personality,cancer advocate, documentary film producer and New York Times best-selling author of The Best Advice I Ever Got: Lessons From Extraordinary Lives. Couric joined Yahoo in 2014 as the Global News [...]

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