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AskAMogulAnything:Hi,I'mGingerZee,theChiefMeteorologistatGoodMorningAmerica.Askmeanythingyou'dlike!UPDATEDANSWERS

Ginger Zee
Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America

All questions will be answered by Ginger Zee on September 13th starting at 10am ET.

Hi - I'm Ginger Zee. I'm a meteorologist and a regular fixture on ABC's Good Morning America.

I've loved weather ever since I was a little girl, growing up in Michigan. I used to be fascinated, watching storms roll in over Lake Michigan.

Some fun facts about me: I don't exactly have a fear of heights. I jumped out of an airplane live on national TV for a GMA segment. I am a proud mom of a beautiful baby boy. And I was a finalist on this past season of Dancing with the Stars. (I was partnered with Val).

Now's your chance to ask me anything! Please write your questions in the comments section below and I'll answer the questions live on Tuesday, September 13th beginning at 10 am ET

It's part of Mogul's new interactive Q &A sessions, Ask A Mogul Anything. 

Come on and ask me *anything* ... about meteorology ... Dancing with the Stars ... working at GMA!

56 replies

As a guest user, you can still reply to conversations. Just press the "Reply" button below, which will prompt you to sign in or sign up on Mogul before your Reply posts.

  • booklover423
    3y ago

    I want to know as a woman - do you ever have moments of self doubt. And if so, what do you do to overcome those moments?

    I want to know as a woman - do you ever have moments of self doubt. And if so, what do you do to overcome those moments?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      I think self-doubt is part of being human. I think some of us are probably harder on ourselves than anybody else possibly could be. And I think that those are the people that I feel for, because that's me. I will come attack myself well before anybody else can possibly do that to me. So I think - what I've gotten better at, and what I can say to everyone, is "Is this going to matter tomorrow?" question that you can ask yourself. And most of the time, the answer's no. I actually, at one point, behind the weather wall, put up a sign that said, "It doesn't matter," because it doesn't. And you gotta let go of that (perfectionism). It doesn't matter. Sometimes when you make a mistake or whatever it is, you could beat yourself up forever or you can say, "I won't do that again. I'm gonna make all the arrangements not to do that again, but I'm gonna move forward." Self-doubt, though, does make you better. So I also wouldn't run away from it. Embrace it. Say, "This is how I feel right now. How do I make myself not feel this way? What can I do in the future?" Because that's the way that you're going to improve, too. Those are the people that are probably the most successful and probably on here, saying the same thing. So give yourself a little medal for the day and say, "I got here. I got to where I am right now. I'm listening and talking about how to become more successful." You're on your way. I think allowing yourself to see your successes and celebrate those, even if they're minute, that will help you, going forward.

      I think self-doubt is part of being human. I think some of us are probably harder on ourselves than anybody else possibly could be. And I think that those are the people that I feel for, because that's me. I will come attack myself well before anybody else can possibly do that to me. So I think - what I've gotten better at, and what I can say to everyone, is "Is this going to matter tomorrow?" question that you can ask yourself. And most of the time, the answer's no. I actually, at one point, behind the weather wall, put up a sign that said, "It doesn't matter," because it doesn't. And you gotta let go of that (perfectionism). It doesn't matter. Sometimes when you make a mistake or whatever it is, you could beat yourself up forever or you can say, "I won't do that again. I'm gonna make all the arrangements not to do that again, but I'm gonna move forward." Self-doubt, though, does make you better. So I also wouldn't run away from it. Embrace it. Say, "This is how I feel right now. How do I make myself not feel this way? What can I do in the future?" Because that's the way that you're going to improve, too. Those are the people that are probably the most successful and probably on here, saying the same thing. So give yourself a little medal for the day and say, "I got here. I got to where I am right now. I'm listening and talking about how to become more successful." You're on your way. I think allowing yourself to see your successes and celebrate those, even if they're minute, that will help you, going forward.

  • Denise Behle 93
    [deleted]
    3y ago

    [deleted]

    [deleted]

  • Denise Behle 93

    Will you continue to do adventure stories on GMA or has motherhood made you more cautious?

    Will you continue to do adventure stories on GMA or has motherhood made you more cautious?

  • Denise Behle 93
    [deleted]
    3y ago

    [deleted]

    [deleted]

  • Denise Behle 93

    You always handle mean questions or comments online with style and grace, do you ever get tempted to lash out trolls?

    You always handle mean questions or comments online with style and grace, do you ever get tempted to lash out trolls?

  • Lydia Baker 83

    You and Ben are honestly one of the cutest couples in the world. Do you have any advice on how to keep a dating/marriage alive in today's society?

    You and Ben are honestly one of the cutest couples in the world. Do you have any advice on how to keep a dating/marriage alive in today's society?

  • Lydia Baker 83

    When you go to a coffee shop like Starbucks or any other shop like that what do you order?

    When you go to a coffee shop like Starbucks or any other shop like that what do you order?

  • Lydia Baker 83

    Hey Ginger, being in the spotlight everyday has proven to change many people in the media, how do you keep yourself so grounded and genuine?

    Hey Ginger, being in the spotlight everyday has proven to change many people in the media, how do you keep yourself so grounded and genuine?

  • Glen Moon 56
    3y ago

    Hi Ginger! I'm a big fan. Just curious did you met your husband in college?

    Hi Ginger! I'm a big fan. Just curious did you met your husband in college?

  • Ginger Zee
    Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
    3y ago

    Hi everyone! Thanks for joining me this morning. I'll be going live now on Facebook Live (https://www.facebook.com/onmogul) - answering the questions live via video. I'll be answering the questions you post here - and taking additional questions that you post here during the course of the live chat. Please ask away!

    Hi everyone! Thanks for joining me this morning. I'll be going live now on Facebook Live (https://www.facebook.com/onmogul) - answering the questions live via video. I'll be answering the questions you post here - and taking additional questions that you post here during the course of the live chat. Please ask away!

  • Georgia Mellis 44

    Why is the East coast & Midwest so humid, but the West coast is so dry? (Barring drought issues).

    Why is the East coast & Midwest so humid, but the West coast is so dry? (Barring drought issues).

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      So it's the jet stream. That's the easiest, most simple description. The jet stream moves our weather and keeps certain areas more arid and dry. So that's why you'll have rainy seasons in California or rainy seasons in parts of Washington or Oregon state. Or you'll have very dry seasons like the last-- two years ago, was it, when Oregon and Washington had this big blob and it was keeping the jet stream way above them. They had no snow. Unfortunately, it looks like that's trying to develop again. And then, as far as-- here, why we have more humidity - the jet dips at different points in different parts of the year. But it comes back up and it allows Gulf moisture. So we're basically, like, tapping into tropical moisture because we have that ability. Up there, you don't have that. You also have a very cold Pacific Ocean. And the Pacific Ocean is not going to inspire a whole lot of moisture in the air. So that's the simple answer.

      So it's the jet stream. That's the easiest, most simple description. The jet stream moves our weather and keeps certain areas more arid and dry. So that's why you'll have rainy seasons in California or rainy seasons in parts of Washington or Oregon state. Or you'll have very dry seasons like the last-- two years ago, was it, when Oregon and Washington had this big blob and it was keeping the jet stream way above them. They had no snow. Unfortunately, it looks like that's trying to develop again. And then, as far as-- here, why we have more humidity - the jet dips at different points in different parts of the year. But it comes back up and it allows Gulf moisture. So we're basically, like, tapping into tropical moisture because we have that ability. Up there, you don't have that. You also have a very cold Pacific Ocean. And the Pacific Ocean is not going to inspire a whole lot of moisture in the air. So that's the simple answer.

  • PT Phillips 19

    Give us a glimpse of a typical day of work for you. What time to you wake up, get to work, get home, etc.? Thanks!

    Give us a glimpse of a typical day of work for you. What time to you wake up, get to work, get home, etc.? Thanks!

    • Ginger Zee
      [deleted]
      3y ago

      [deleted]

      [deleted]

      • Ginger Zee
        Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
        3y ago

        So it's not always the same. It's often quite different. But a regular day for me would be waking up around 3:30, 4:00 in the morning and then getting to GMA. I usually look at my computer modeling the night before because a lot of them get in before I go to sleep. So I've kind of forecasted the generic general view, the jet stream, how it's moving, and then I focus in in the morning on where the headline is that I'll be covering. So whatever the biggest story across the nation is or sometimes the world --like today we had a typhoon that ended up being the biggest story. So that's what I focus in on. A lot of my morning is spent looking for images and video. We're responsible, me and the other meteorologists on my team, for finding all of the video and such. So I play a big part in that. And then the makeup, the hair, everything happens. And by 6:20 I'm doing promos with affiliates. So we really start much earlier than the actual show starts at 7:00. The show runs from 7:00 to 9:00. We often do some meetings and things happen, you know, right after that. I sometimes get a break. If I have a shoot or something, I'll go run and do that. But I (often) get a break from 10:30 or 11:00 until maybe 2:00. And then I go back to work for the evening news a lot of times-- with David Muir. And so I do World News. That's a normal day. Now, obviously when I'm on a hurricane like last week when I was in Florida, there is no stopping. You're working all platforms all the time. You're constantly on the go because you're reporting and you're anchoring parts (of the broadcast), and it really ends up feeling like you're on a 24-hour news network because there's so many things pulling at you which is one of my favorite places to be. Because all I'm doing in those situations is talking about something I love, and that's the atmosphere. I try to go to bed before 9:30. If I do that, I've won because then I get six hours of sleep, and that's pretty good. If I don't get that much sleep, depending on what the baby's doing and whatever's happening-- I definitely try to reserve a little time for a nap, a workout sometimes. So that's what I'll get in between (Good Morning America and World News Tonight). And I try my best to just take face makeup off so I can keep my eye makeup on. 'Cause it saves so much time when I end up going back to work-- because of that split shift.

        So it's not always the same. It's often quite different. But a regular day for me would be waking up around 3:30, 4:00 in the morning and then getting to GMA. I usually look at my computer modeling the night before because a lot of them get in before I go to sleep. So I've kind of forecasted the generic general view, the jet stream, how it's moving, and then I focus in in the morning on where the headline is that I'll be covering. So whatever the biggest story across the nation is or sometimes the world --like today we had a typhoon that ended up being the biggest story. So that's what I focus in on. A lot of my morning is spent looking for images and video. We're responsible, me and the other meteorologists on my team, for finding all of the video and such. So I play a big part in that. And then the makeup, the hair, everything happens. And by 6:20 I'm doing promos with affiliates. So we really start much earlier than the actual show starts at 7:00. The show runs from 7:00 to 9:00. We often do some meetings and things happen, you know, right after that. I sometimes get a break. If I have a shoot or something, I'll go run and do that. But I (often) get a break from 10:30 or 11:00 until maybe 2:00. And then I go back to work for the evening news a lot of times-- with David Muir. And so I do World News. That's a normal day. Now, obviously when I'm on a hurricane like last week when I was in Florida, there is no stopping. You're working all platforms all the time. You're constantly on the go because you're reporting and you're anchoring parts (of the broadcast), and it really ends up feeling like you're on a 24-hour news network because there's so many things pulling at you which is one of my favorite places to be. Because all I'm doing in those situations is talking about something I love, and that's the atmosphere. I try to go to bed before 9:30. If I do that, I've won because then I get six hours of sleep, and that's pretty good. If I don't get that much sleep, depending on what the baby's doing and whatever's happening-- I definitely try to reserve a little time for a nap, a workout sometimes. So that's what I'll get in between (Good Morning America and World News Tonight). And I try my best to just take face makeup off so I can keep my eye makeup on. 'Cause it saves so much time when I end up going back to work-- because of that split shift.

      • PT Phillips 19

        Thanks Ginger! Wow!

        Thanks Ginger! Wow!

  • Dale Strandberg 3

    Hi Ginger, did you always wanted to be a meteorologist?

    Hi Ginger, did you always wanted to be a meteorologist?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      I wanted to be a meteorologist since I was probably eight. I fell in love with thunderstorms coming across Lake Michigan. And my brother and I would be out there, and my mom would be freaking out. She's very overprotective. We'd have a 15-mile-per-hour gust anywhere and she'd tell us, "Get in the basement." So I think I was really interested in the weather from an early age. And then I was in high school and my teacher said, "You're always talking about it. Why don't you think about going into meteorology?" And I was like, wow! I'm so glad that I finally listened to my heart and to what I loved. And that's always my suggestion for students: if you're passionate-- That's it. You go do it. Because if you love it, you're going to get a job. If you love what you do, your passion will be seen in some way.

      I wanted to be a meteorologist since I was probably eight. I fell in love with thunderstorms coming across Lake Michigan. And my brother and I would be out there, and my mom would be freaking out. She's very overprotective. We'd have a 15-mile-per-hour gust anywhere and she'd tell us, "Get in the basement." So I think I was really interested in the weather from an early age. And then I was in high school and my teacher said, "You're always talking about it. Why don't you think about going into meteorology?" And I was like, wow! I'm so glad that I finally listened to my heart and to what I loved. And that's always my suggestion for students: if you're passionate-- That's it. You go do it. Because if you love it, you're going to get a job. If you love what you do, your passion will be seen in some way.

  • Paige Knapp
    3y ago Philadelphia / NYC

    Hi Ginger! Love GMA and love your sunny disposition every morning. What was your experience like as a woman in a mostly male field? Did you face any particular challenges as a result?

    Hi Ginger! Love GMA and love your sunny disposition every morning. What was your experience like as a woman in a mostly male field? Did you face any particular challenges as a result?

  • Paige Knapp
    3y ago Philadelphia / NYC

    Hi Ginger! Love GMA and love your sunny disposition every morning. What was your experience like as a woman in a mostly male field? Did you face any particular challenges as a result?

    Hi Ginger! Love GMA and love your sunny disposition every morning. What was your experience like as a woman in a mostly male field? Did you face any particular challenges as a result?

  • Courtney Dercqu
    Courtney Dercqu Content Marketing Strategist & Writer
    3y ago

    Hi! This may be a really weird question but I've always been curious as to what it's like to stand in front of the green screen and be positive you're pointing to the right area of a map. My fiancé is a TV producer and put me in front of a green screen once and I totally panicked! Lol. When you first started, were you nervous about doing that? Also, I'm a huge fan of DWTS - what was your favorite dance on the show? Me, I was always partial to the Disney week! Big fan - look forward to hearing from you!

    Hi! This may be a really weird question but I've always been curious as to what it's like to stand in front of the green screen and be positive you're pointing to the right area of a map. My fiancé is a TV producer and put me in front of a green screen once and I totally panicked! Lol. When you first started, were you nervous about doing that? Also, I'm a huge fan of DWTS - what was your favorite dance on the show? Me, I was always partial to the Disney week! Big fan - look forward to hearing from you!

  • Steph Lawler
    3y ago

    I'm a huge fan and it seems like you have it all! You are so blessed. With marriage, did it take you time to find the right one? Did you know right away he was the right match for you?

    I'm a huge fan and it seems like you have it all! You are so blessed. With marriage, did it take you time to find the right one? Did you know right away he was the right match for you?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      I did not think this was going to happen. Part of it was my fault. I didn't put people first. I just didn't. I don't know if I wasn't ready or they weren't the right person; probably it was that they were not the right person. When I met Ben, I was in love in ten seconds, which was typical for me. I was very much a diver. Like, there's a relationship; I'm here. I'm, like, immediately Mrs. Whoever it is. (LAUGH) And that had gotten me into trouble in the past but I was still doing it. I was passionate about it. So I emailed him right away. The second after I met him, I'm like, "We need to be friends." And he's like, "Friends? I wasn't gonna be your friend." So we went on a date. And he was set. Like, he says, after that first date, he knew he wanted to marry me. And Ben's not one to mince words, so he was very clear. He's a communicator. I was scared by that. And so I think we went on two more dates, and then I was like, "I can't see you anymore." I just-- I wasn't ready to be treated so nicely. And I broke up with him, as he calls it. I said, "You can't break up with (LAUGH) people if you've only gone on three dates." But in his world, you can. A couple months went by. He saw me covering Hurricane Sandy and he wrote me again and was like, "I want you to stay safe, you know." And I wrote him after-- and I hadn't talked to him anymore after that. And I wrote him because I saw him on TV. And I was like, "Hey, I'm just wondering how you are." . So then we dated again. And then he got too close, too fast, again, and it was like, whoa, and I broke up with him for a second time. I am very lucky that he is persistent enough and forgiving enough. The third time that he came to me was in response to me changing my hair color - And he was like, "Are you changed now, too?" (LAUGH) And I was. I think that I finally gave myself the okay. And honestly, I had been going to therapy. I had been in terrible relationships where I had been treated so poorly. And I think I was finally ready (for a good relationship), and I knew I was ready. It had just taken me six months since I met him to be ready and in a place where I could accept his love and give him respect and love back. And that's what I think everybody needs to be ready to do. And it doesn't happen at all points in life. So from that moment, I just-- I would consistently-- when his texts would come up-- (LAUGH) whatever it was, like, way aggressive. I'd be like, "Okay. It's okay. He loves me." And the more I did that, the more amazing it felt, and the more I thought, wow, this is real life. I've never had a relationship like this where we don't talk all day. I mean-- he texts me something funny in the morning just because the baby did something funny. But it's the most trusting and wonderful relationship. It's not that we don't have disagreements. Of course, we have all those things. But I think I do have it all because of Ben. And I didn't have it all before. But I also know that this is a ridge. You know, we always say in meteorology there's troughs and ridges, and I've definitely had some big troughs. And there are too many stories, and it's-- it's way too depressing to talk about all of the troughs. Everyone's got a past. And I definitely had some down time, and I know I will again in the future. Life doesn't stay right here. But I'm gonna enjoy every second of it while I'm here.

      I did not think this was going to happen. Part of it was my fault. I didn't put people first. I just didn't. I don't know if I wasn't ready or they weren't the right person; probably it was that they were not the right person. When I met Ben, I was in love in ten seconds, which was typical for me. I was very much a diver. Like, there's a relationship; I'm here. I'm, like, immediately Mrs. Whoever it is. (LAUGH) And that had gotten me into trouble in the past but I was still doing it. I was passionate about it. So I emailed him right away. The second after I met him, I'm like, "We need to be friends." And he's like, "Friends? I wasn't gonna be your friend." So we went on a date. And he was set. Like, he says, after that first date, he knew he wanted to marry me. And Ben's not one to mince words, so he was very clear. He's a communicator. I was scared by that. And so I think we went on two more dates, and then I was like, "I can't see you anymore." I just-- I wasn't ready to be treated so nicely. And I broke up with him, as he calls it. I said, "You can't break up with (LAUGH) people if you've only gone on three dates." But in his world, you can. A couple months went by. He saw me covering Hurricane Sandy and he wrote me again and was like, "I want you to stay safe, you know." And I wrote him after-- and I hadn't talked to him anymore after that. And I wrote him because I saw him on TV. And I was like, "Hey, I'm just wondering how you are." . So then we dated again. And then he got too close, too fast, again, and it was like, whoa, and I broke up with him for a second time. I am very lucky that he is persistent enough and forgiving enough. The third time that he came to me was in response to me changing my hair color - And he was like, "Are you changed now, too?" (LAUGH) And I was. I think that I finally gave myself the okay. And honestly, I had been going to therapy. I had been in terrible relationships where I had been treated so poorly. And I think I was finally ready (for a good relationship), and I knew I was ready. It had just taken me six months since I met him to be ready and in a place where I could accept his love and give him respect and love back. And that's what I think everybody needs to be ready to do. And it doesn't happen at all points in life. So from that moment, I just-- I would consistently-- when his texts would come up-- (LAUGH) whatever it was, like, way aggressive. I'd be like, "Okay. It's okay. He loves me." And the more I did that, the more amazing it felt, and the more I thought, wow, this is real life. I've never had a relationship like this where we don't talk all day. I mean-- he texts me something funny in the morning just because the baby did something funny. But it's the most trusting and wonderful relationship. It's not that we don't have disagreements. Of course, we have all those things. But I think I do have it all because of Ben. And I didn't have it all before. But I also know that this is a ridge. You know, we always say in meteorology there's troughs and ridges, and I've definitely had some big troughs. And there are too many stories, and it's-- it's way too depressing to talk about all of the troughs. Everyone's got a past. And I definitely had some down time, and I know I will again in the future. Life doesn't stay right here. But I'm gonna enjoy every second of it while I'm here.

    • Steph Lawler
      3y ago

      What's your story of how you all met? I love these kind of stories!

      What's your story of how you all met? I love these kind of stories!

  • jen
    jen
    3y ago

    What was it like to work in local television? Did you always want to work at a major network?

    What was it like to work in local television? Did you always want to work at a major network?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      That's a great question. Local TV is my favorite. I actually miss it. It's funny -- I will go back and watch pieces that I did when I was 24, from Grand Rapids and I'm proud of them. There are such opportunities in local where you can still tell that story, where you can still get into that person in your community, and you could have a real impact. Not that we can't on a national level, but there's definitely a difference. And in weather, whew, it's a big difference. So I miss my three-minute weathercasts so much. So did I always wanna be at a network? Absolutely. The second I said to myself, "I'm going to be in TV, instead of being in research or whatever I had wanted in meteorology--" I said, "I better go for it. I better go all the way." And then I got the job at GMA - And I think I thought, "Well, this is it, right?" And now, I've realized that this is just the beginning. This is just the platform. This is the part where I can take science and hopefully inspire especially young girls. That's my goal.

      That's a great question. Local TV is my favorite. I actually miss it. It's funny -- I will go back and watch pieces that I did when I was 24, from Grand Rapids and I'm proud of them. There are such opportunities in local where you can still tell that story, where you can still get into that person in your community, and you could have a real impact. Not that we can't on a national level, but there's definitely a difference. And in weather, whew, it's a big difference. So I miss my three-minute weathercasts so much. So did I always wanna be at a network? Absolutely. The second I said to myself, "I'm going to be in TV, instead of being in research or whatever I had wanted in meteorology--" I said, "I better go for it. I better go all the way." And then I got the job at GMA - And I think I thought, "Well, this is it, right?" And now, I've realized that this is just the beginning. This is just the platform. This is the part where I can take science and hopefully inspire especially young girls. That's my goal.

  • Malika Josephson

    How do you balance being a busy woman within media, a wife and mother? Has it taken time to find that balance?

    How do you balance being a busy woman within media, a wife and mother? Has it taken time to find that balance?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      Oh my gosh, I think it's a constant evolution and I'm never going to be fully balanced. I think anybody that says they're fully balanced is probably lying. (LAUGH) The thing is - I think you're always going to feel guilty about something. But what I learned, especially after I had the baby and I was doing Dancing with the Stars, was that I had to prioritize. If I had an hour to spend with that baby, there was no phone, there was no anything else; it was me and the baby. And I got very good at focusing; being in that moment. Never in my life have I been so on it. I've always procrastinated. I've always said, "Oh, I'll wait until later. I'll do that later." Now, after the baby, I don't have time later. I've learned you've got to do it right now-- whether it's a workout or getting a presentation done. I'm speaking at a weather conference tomorrow. And I said, "I have to get it done now because I need to spend time with that child. And I need to focus." And so it's not about are you great at balancing? It's about how you prioritize. And at the end of the week, or the end of the day, I feel confident and powerful and like I did a good job if I made sure to touch everybody as much as I possibly could to let them know that I love them. My priorities are Ben, the baby, and then everything else. And so, as long as I'm doing that, I think I'm all right. And I've also learned that I've got to take care of myself. I think people often allow that to slip. (But taking the time to take care of myself) helps me to stay balanced.

      Oh my gosh, I think it's a constant evolution and I'm never going to be fully balanced. I think anybody that says they're fully balanced is probably lying. (LAUGH) The thing is - I think you're always going to feel guilty about something. But what I learned, especially after I had the baby and I was doing Dancing with the Stars, was that I had to prioritize. If I had an hour to spend with that baby, there was no phone, there was no anything else; it was me and the baby. And I got very good at focusing; being in that moment. Never in my life have I been so on it. I've always procrastinated. I've always said, "Oh, I'll wait until later. I'll do that later." Now, after the baby, I don't have time later. I've learned you've got to do it right now-- whether it's a workout or getting a presentation done. I'm speaking at a weather conference tomorrow. And I said, "I have to get it done now because I need to spend time with that child. And I need to focus." And so it's not about are you great at balancing? It's about how you prioritize. And at the end of the week, or the end of the day, I feel confident and powerful and like I did a good job if I made sure to touch everybody as much as I possibly could to let them know that I love them. My priorities are Ben, the baby, and then everything else. And so, as long as I'm doing that, I think I'm all right. And I've also learned that I've got to take care of myself. I think people often allow that to slip. (But taking the time to take care of myself) helps me to stay balanced.

  • Bethany Heinrich
    Bethany Heinrich Mogul Influencer
    3y ago New York, NY, United States

    Hi Ginger! What's your advice to women who would like to pursue being a meteorologist as well as a broadcast journalist, especially in morning television?

    Hi Ginger! What's your advice to women who would like to pursue being a meteorologist as well as a broadcast journalist, especially in morning television?

  • Janet Mason
    3y ago

    Hello! I watch Good Morning America everyday and am a loyal viewer. What inside scoop can you give us on what it's like to work there and what your colleagues are like?

    Hello! I watch Good Morning America everyday and am a loyal viewer. What inside scoop can you give us on what it's like to work there and what your colleagues are like?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      Inside scoop? I'd say to work at GMA - it's a circus that's the best circus in the world. I think I'm very fortunate. I know I'm so fortunate to have this job. I've worked really hard to get here. But it's a constantly changing evolution of people who love what they do. I'm not alone. Most of the people I work with, behind the scenes and the ones that you see on TV, are so happy to be there. And I think, hopefully, that comes across. The people? I'd say Robin, in general, has been my number-one cheerleader. She's the one that's always lookin' out for me. She's the one that's gonna help. I trust her and I believe in her, and I love what she does. I think she's so good at television, not because she reads something well or that she does a great interview, because she does both of those things. What she does is she looks around the room. She looks around the room and she'll figure out something about someone, and that little-- that part that's going to make us different and set us apart. And I think that is something that she's so great at. Then, there's Michael, you know, who's just joined, full-time. And I think what he's great at is the generosity. Generosity on TV's very difficult. Knowing who you're talking to, knowing the room, and when you make someone else look better, you look better. He is key at that. He is so good and so curious and he asks really great questions in the most personable, normal manner. Like, everybody at home's thinking that. And that's, I believe, something that's going to help all of us. He's such a great energy. So those are examples of, like, the people that I work with, that I admire. It's like I'm constantly studying. I'm always watching. For me, they're the best and I want to keep learning to be more and more like them. QUESTION: 22:43:50;05 Well, that's what makes you the best. GINGER ZEE: 22:43:51;05 I hope so-- QUESTION: 22:43:51;25 You're always looking. (LAUGH) So it's-- it's great. Question from Malika: "How do you balance being a busy woman within media, a wife and a mom? Has it taken time to find that balance?" GINGER ZEE: 22:44:01;26 Oh my gosh, I think it's a constant evolution and I'm never gonna be fully balanced. I think anybody that says that's probably lying. (LAUGH) And you're always gonna feel guilty. I don't know. There's-- on both sides, you know, I feel like, especially after I had the baby and I was doing dancing, it was such a great habit to get in because it made me prioritize. 22:44:19;22 If I had an hour to spend with that baby, there was no phone

      Inside scoop? I'd say to work at GMA - it's a circus that's the best circus in the world. I think I'm very fortunate. I know I'm so fortunate to have this job. I've worked really hard to get here. But it's a constantly changing evolution of people who love what they do. I'm not alone. Most of the people I work with, behind the scenes and the ones that you see on TV, are so happy to be there. And I think, hopefully, that comes across. The people? I'd say Robin, in general, has been my number-one cheerleader. She's the one that's always lookin' out for me. She's the one that's gonna help. I trust her and I believe in her, and I love what she does. I think she's so good at television, not because she reads something well or that she does a great interview, because she does both of those things. What she does is she looks around the room. She looks around the room and she'll figure out something about someone, and that little-- that part that's going to make us different and set us apart. And I think that is something that she's so great at. Then, there's Michael, you know, who's just joined, full-time. And I think what he's great at is the generosity. Generosity on TV's very difficult. Knowing who you're talking to, knowing the room, and when you make someone else look better, you look better. He is key at that. He is so good and so curious and he asks really great questions in the most personable, normal manner. Like, everybody at home's thinking that. And that's, I believe, something that's going to help all of us. He's such a great energy. So those are examples of, like, the people that I work with, that I admire. It's like I'm constantly studying. I'm always watching. For me, they're the best and I want to keep learning to be more and more like them. QUESTION: 22:43:50;05 Well, that's what makes you the best. GINGER ZEE: 22:43:51;05 I hope so-- QUESTION: 22:43:51;25 You're always looking. (LAUGH) So it's-- it's great. Question from Malika: "How do you balance being a busy woman within media, a wife and a mom? Has it taken time to find that balance?" GINGER ZEE: 22:44:01;26 Oh my gosh, I think it's a constant evolution and I'm never gonna be fully balanced. I think anybody that says that's probably lying. (LAUGH) And you're always gonna feel guilty. I don't know. There's-- on both sides, you know, I feel like, especially after I had the baby and I was doing dancing, it was such a great habit to get in because it made me prioritize. 22:44:19;22 If I had an hour to spend with that baby, there was no phone

  • Abby Waldman
    3y ago

    Hi, do you believe in global warming? What should our world be doing to help save our planet?

    Hi, do you believe in global warming? What should our world be doing to help save our planet?

    • Abby Waldman
      3y ago

      And what's it like to be a woman in your industry? Do you find there's great equality or is it something where we are still having to fight for the same treatment as men receive?

      And what's it like to be a woman in your industry? Do you find there's great equality or is it something where we are still having to fight for the same treatment as men receive?

  • Maddy Bernstein

    Hi Ginger! What is it like to work in morning television? How is the aspect of the industry changing with the rise of digital?

    Hi Ginger! What is it like to work in morning television? How is the aspect of the industry changing with the rise of digital?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      That's a great question. Working in morning TV, I think, is my favorite type of TV. I've worked at all hours of television. I did love Dancing with the Stars. But that prime time type of entertainment show is a whole beast of its own. DWTS was awesome. And they are consummate professionals, and they're such a well-oiled machine there. I loved it. But as far as mornings go, once you get over the fact that you've gotten up at 3:30 a.m. and the rest of your life will never be the same, (LAUGH) and you're always going to be a little tired, I think the beauty of it is you get to start the morning with everyone. You get to have that moment and you get to be that smile, hopefully, that people see or wake up to, and that's a huge responsibility, but also such an opportunity, I feel like; sharing that moment with people. Most people are pretty happy in the morning, I'd say. That's the case for the majority of the people I work with. And I love going to work and having that energy. It's been, I'd say, just such a joy to be on in the morning, and I hope to be in morning TV for a very long time.

      That's a great question. Working in morning TV, I think, is my favorite type of TV. I've worked at all hours of television. I did love Dancing with the Stars. But that prime time type of entertainment show is a whole beast of its own. DWTS was awesome. And they are consummate professionals, and they're such a well-oiled machine there. I loved it. But as far as mornings go, once you get over the fact that you've gotten up at 3:30 a.m. and the rest of your life will never be the same, (LAUGH) and you're always going to be a little tired, I think the beauty of it is you get to start the morning with everyone. You get to have that moment and you get to be that smile, hopefully, that people see or wake up to, and that's a huge responsibility, but also such an opportunity, I feel like; sharing that moment with people. Most people are pretty happy in the morning, I'd say. That's the case for the majority of the people I work with. And I love going to work and having that energy. It's been, I'd say, just such a joy to be on in the morning, and I hope to be in morning TV for a very long time.

      • Ginger Zee
        Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
        3y ago

        As for the second part of the question is, "How is morning television evolving?" Greatly. It's evolving right in front of our eyes. This last two weeks, GMA-- we've made changes to go toward what we hope people will want to see. I feel safe that I'm still in a headline situation when we've got a big story and we need expertise to explain that; to get into the science. But there are going to be other ways to utilize my strengths or my talents, and that's what we're doing in morning TV is finding that other thing that makes you want to come and spend your morning with me, and makes you want to learn that part of the weather with me instead of reading it. That's what we have to do. It is a competition of that sort. And if you don't, you don't. But we've got to grab you in other ways, digitally. And so it's an expansion of what we've done. We're showing a lot more behind the scenes. Responding to stuff like this, being able to interact; that is, I think, what you'll see a little bit more of, and I hope to be a part of, building that out. And also honoring the people that come to see the show. You talk about waking up early. Our biggest fans are the folks that come to GMA - that come and see us in Times Square, and now we have them in a live audience setting. So being able to not just have them sit there and smile pretty (they clap and do all that stuff), but recognize them, find out their stories; that human touch of Good Morning America. These women this morning from Dayton, Ohio, and Cincinnati, were in from-- their little boutique that they were-- you know, that they buy things from New York, and they were here for Fashion Week. It's so good and fresh to have those folks on. So I think that's something that you'll be seeing more of,

        As for the second part of the question is, "How is morning television evolving?" Greatly. It's evolving right in front of our eyes. This last two weeks, GMA-- we've made changes to go toward what we hope people will want to see. I feel safe that I'm still in a headline situation when we've got a big story and we need expertise to explain that; to get into the science. But there are going to be other ways to utilize my strengths or my talents, and that's what we're doing in morning TV is finding that other thing that makes you want to come and spend your morning with me, and makes you want to learn that part of the weather with me instead of reading it. That's what we have to do. It is a competition of that sort. And if you don't, you don't. But we've got to grab you in other ways, digitally. And so it's an expansion of what we've done. We're showing a lot more behind the scenes. Responding to stuff like this, being able to interact; that is, I think, what you'll see a little bit more of, and I hope to be a part of, building that out. And also honoring the people that come to see the show. You talk about waking up early. Our biggest fans are the folks that come to GMA - that come and see us in Times Square, and now we have them in a live audience setting. So being able to not just have them sit there and smile pretty (they clap and do all that stuff), but recognize them, find out their stories; that human touch of Good Morning America. These women this morning from Dayton, Ohio, and Cincinnati, were in from-- their little boutique that they were-- you know, that they buy things from New York, and they were here for Fashion Week. It's so good and fresh to have those folks on. So I think that's something that you'll be seeing more of,

  • glasshalffull100

    You have a new show about food. Was this a passion project? What's the most interesting thing you learned in doing the show?

    You have a new show about food. Was this a passion project? What's the most interesting thing you learned in doing the show?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      I'm so happy I'm doing it. It's called Food Forecast. And basically it started when I was a consultant briefly for Kendall Jackson when I was a meteorologist in Chicago. Kendall Jackson came to me and said, "Hey, people trust you with the weather. We are moving some things in Napa and we want a meteorologist to explain micro climates in Napa." And so I went and I talked to these investors at this big party. And-- seeing the two things that I love most, climate and wine, I thought, "That's a show. That's gotta be a show." So I kept thinking because I grew up on a small farm in a rural area where people rely on agriculture. I thought, "Wouldn't that be the best," is to put those two things that people love, food on TV and then weather, and (include) a little science in there so people really learn? And so my intention with each of these episodes is, first, to have you absolutely start understanding what's on your plate, realizing where it comes from, going a little in that Mr. Rogers vein of things and go into the production of it, see how it's done so that you respect and admire the work that's put into it. Because I feel like that has been lost in a lot of places. And then to explore - are there challenges that these people are facing? And do they have to do with the weather? That's the type of story that we're going after, whether it's a positive or a negative happening. We look at the way that a growing season has changed or how we've shifted where growing seasons move on the map. That's all fascinating to me. It's a little niche. It's a little focused, and it's definitely a lot science-y. But if you're ready to learn and sit down and enjoy and also be highly entertained, I hope, by the characters that we meet, this is such a dream for me. Because again, the way television has changed, you don't always get to sit down, meet a character, see them evolve, see their product or whoever they are evolve and see how it all works. This really allows for the time. And you can find it on the ABC News app. So if you're on Apple TV or Roku and you click on the ABC News app, it's right up in there. And then it's also online digitally. Food Forecast.

      I'm so happy I'm doing it. It's called Food Forecast. And basically it started when I was a consultant briefly for Kendall Jackson when I was a meteorologist in Chicago. Kendall Jackson came to me and said, "Hey, people trust you with the weather. We are moving some things in Napa and we want a meteorologist to explain micro climates in Napa." And so I went and I talked to these investors at this big party. And-- seeing the two things that I love most, climate and wine, I thought, "That's a show. That's gotta be a show." So I kept thinking because I grew up on a small farm in a rural area where people rely on agriculture. I thought, "Wouldn't that be the best," is to put those two things that people love, food on TV and then weather, and (include) a little science in there so people really learn? And so my intention with each of these episodes is, first, to have you absolutely start understanding what's on your plate, realizing where it comes from, going a little in that Mr. Rogers vein of things and go into the production of it, see how it's done so that you respect and admire the work that's put into it. Because I feel like that has been lost in a lot of places. And then to explore - are there challenges that these people are facing? And do they have to do with the weather? That's the type of story that we're going after, whether it's a positive or a negative happening. We look at the way that a growing season has changed or how we've shifted where growing seasons move on the map. That's all fascinating to me. It's a little niche. It's a little focused, and it's definitely a lot science-y. But if you're ready to learn and sit down and enjoy and also be highly entertained, I hope, by the characters that we meet, this is such a dream for me. Because again, the way television has changed, you don't always get to sit down, meet a character, see them evolve, see their product or whoever they are evolve and see how it all works. This really allows for the time. And you can find it on the ABC News app. So if you're on Apple TV or Roku and you click on the ABC News app, it's right up in there. And then it's also online digitally. Food Forecast.

  • miranda444
    3y ago

    Also want to know - do you ever get star struck? You meet so many people every day on GMA. Is there someone who even you were excited or nervous or really amazed to meet?

    Also want to know - do you ever get star struck? You meet so many people every day on GMA. Is there someone who even you were excited or nervous or really amazed to meet?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      Do you know-- this just happened to me for the first time? I would've thought I would be starstruck around George Clooney. Nope, I felt totally normal, and it was wonderful. I would've thought Jennifer Lopez would make me nervous. No, I really enjoyed her and she was wonderful. And I didn't have any, like, fluttery feelings. But the new Bachelor? This is so weird. *He* made me shake. I was so-- and yes, I watch The Bachelor. But it's not even that. It's not even that I had seen him on television and then he was in front of me. It's that he is so charming. And he's got that Bill Clinton magnetism. So the new Bachelor made me nervous and then, this is another weird one, Alex Trebek. I met him when I did Celebrity Jeopardy. (LAUGH) I was obsessed.

      Do you know-- this just happened to me for the first time? I would've thought I would be starstruck around George Clooney. Nope, I felt totally normal, and it was wonderful. I would've thought Jennifer Lopez would make me nervous. No, I really enjoyed her and she was wonderful. And I didn't have any, like, fluttery feelings. But the new Bachelor? This is so weird. *He* made me shake. I was so-- and yes, I watch The Bachelor. But it's not even that. It's not even that I had seen him on television and then he was in front of me. It's that he is so charming. And he's got that Bill Clinton magnetism. So the new Bachelor made me nervous and then, this is another weird one, Alex Trebek. I met him when I did Celebrity Jeopardy. (LAUGH) I was obsessed.

  • miranda444
    3y ago

    Hi Ginger - You have done so many amazing things on GMA. What are some of the most fun and crazy things you have ever done?

    Hi Ginger - You have done so many amazing things on GMA. What are some of the most fun and crazy things you have ever done?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      I love that we went to Iceland and sent a drone into a volcano. That was just-- it's so surreal. And that was one of those moments that I wish I was able to be in the moment more . I remember in the helicopter after we were (done with the segment) thinking, "What just happened?" (LAUGH) They said, "You gotta do World News and then we're gonna fly out and you have to be on GMA the next morning in Iceland." So it was, like, an overnight trip. I landed, there was a two-hour drive, two-hour helicopter ride-- to this, you know, fissure of a volcano. And we had this geologist who was with us. And he was almost in tears watching science unfold in front of him, to do something that he had never been able to do before, measure that close into a volcano, temperature. You could see it in his eyes that he was so happy. And it was such a cool moment and such a teachable moment. When I was looking at social media afterward -- at the teachers and students and parents and everybody responding-- I had more response to that event, and that meant so much to me. So that one was big. Another huge story was Vietnam, (exploring) the biggest cave in the world. It was a ten-day trip. It was wild. I was newly pregnant and couldn't tell anybody, so that one's memorable. It smelled really bad, (LAUGH) really bad. It's something a lot of people don't realize. It was an interesting trip but also fascinating scientifically. You were down there and scientists were there in the vicinity of us finding species that have never been seen on earth. So knowing that those places still exist, that was really cool.

      I love that we went to Iceland and sent a drone into a volcano. That was just-- it's so surreal. And that was one of those moments that I wish I was able to be in the moment more . I remember in the helicopter after we were (done with the segment) thinking, "What just happened?" (LAUGH) They said, "You gotta do World News and then we're gonna fly out and you have to be on GMA the next morning in Iceland." So it was, like, an overnight trip. I landed, there was a two-hour drive, two-hour helicopter ride-- to this, you know, fissure of a volcano. And we had this geologist who was with us. And he was almost in tears watching science unfold in front of him, to do something that he had never been able to do before, measure that close into a volcano, temperature. You could see it in his eyes that he was so happy. And it was such a cool moment and such a teachable moment. When I was looking at social media afterward -- at the teachers and students and parents and everybody responding-- I had more response to that event, and that meant so much to me. So that one was big. Another huge story was Vietnam, (exploring) the biggest cave in the world. It was a ten-day trip. It was wild. I was newly pregnant and couldn't tell anybody, so that one's memorable. It smelled really bad, (LAUGH) really bad. It's something a lot of people don't realize. It was an interesting trip but also fascinating scientifically. You were down there and scientists were there in the vicinity of us finding species that have never been seen on earth. So knowing that those places still exist, that was really cool.

  • Amanda222
    3y ago

    Also - what are your thoughts on how men and women are treated when it comes to TV news? Do you think that women are still held to a higher standard than men when it comes to how they look - and especially how they age and how much or how little they weigh? Or do you think it is getting better?

    Also - what are your thoughts on how men and women are treated when it comes to TV news? Do you think that women are still held to a higher standard than men when it comes to how they look - and especially how they age and how much or how little they weigh? Or do you think it is getting better?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      I think there's improvement always. I think that the world is improving in general. I want to stay hopeful and hope that's happening. But there's absolutely nothing fair (LAUGH) at this point about (the difference in the way men and women are treated in TV). And I don't think it's always on (just one) side. I think sometimes men get a harder rap on certain things. Clothing is one of those things that has been in my face all the time. I'm often envious of the guys who can wear the same suit several times-- switch up the tie and they're done. They're always, always comfortable in the studio. I'm freezing every single day. These are very, very minimal things, but clothing is something that's unfair. Financially, men and women are not even. I know that for a fact. That's been drawn out, and I think that needs to change.

      I think there's improvement always. I think that the world is improving in general. I want to stay hopeful and hope that's happening. But there's absolutely nothing fair (LAUGH) at this point about (the difference in the way men and women are treated in TV). And I don't think it's always on (just one) side. I think sometimes men get a harder rap on certain things. Clothing is one of those things that has been in my face all the time. I'm often envious of the guys who can wear the same suit several times-- switch up the tie and they're done. They're always, always comfortable in the studio. I'm freezing every single day. These are very, very minimal things, but clothing is something that's unfair. Financially, men and women are not even. I know that for a fact. That's been drawn out, and I think that needs to change.

  • Amanda222
    3y ago

    Hi Ginger - Such a big fan. What's your advice to young women who want to pursue meteorology or want to become an on-camera meteorologist?

    Hi Ginger - Such a big fan. What's your advice to young women who want to pursue meteorology or want to become an on-camera meteorologist?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      I think that question is awesome. Obviously the education's number one. You have to get a science degree. You *have* to. Second, doing a job shadow is a great idea. My advice is to go to the National Weather Service, go to a television station or reach out to them online and just say, "Hey, I'm really interested (in doing a job shadow)." You'll be surprised at how many people write back and say, "Sure. We'd love to have you in." That will give you that little window into finding out if you really like it or not. You may not really know. And then most importantly, I'd tell you (to get out your phone and use the video camera function). (Thanks to cell phones), everybody can do a forecast every day. So if you want to, using your video function on your phone and recording yourself is the best way to practice being a meteorologist. Have somebody stand with you in the mall, at home, in your closet. I don't care where you do your forecast. Keep working on speaking to a camera, and that is the most invaluable part of what you can do to prepare yourself on a daily basis.

      I think that question is awesome. Obviously the education's number one. You have to get a science degree. You *have* to. Second, doing a job shadow is a great idea. My advice is to go to the National Weather Service, go to a television station or reach out to them online and just say, "Hey, I'm really interested (in doing a job shadow)." You'll be surprised at how many people write back and say, "Sure. We'd love to have you in." That will give you that little window into finding out if you really like it or not. You may not really know. And then most importantly, I'd tell you (to get out your phone and use the video camera function). (Thanks to cell phones), everybody can do a forecast every day. So if you want to, using your video function on your phone and recording yourself is the best way to practice being a meteorologist. Have somebody stand with you in the mall, at home, in your closet. I don't care where you do your forecast. Keep working on speaking to a camera, and that is the most invaluable part of what you can do to prepare yourself on a daily basis.

    • Ginger Zee
      [deleted]
      3y ago

      [deleted]

      [deleted]

  • Lydia Baker 83

    If you were to do DWTS again. What dance would you want to do that you didn't dance last season?

    If you were to do DWTS again. What dance would you want to do that you didn't dance last season?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      You know, watching last night, I would say the cha-cha. Val and I never got to do the cha-cha. I would do the cha-cha tomorrow if I could learn it tomorrow.

      You know, watching last night, I would say the cha-cha. Val and I never got to do the cha-cha. I would do the cha-cha tomorrow if I could learn it tomorrow.

  • Lydia Baker 83
    [deleted]
    3y ago

    [deleted]

    [deleted]

  • Miranda Baxley 41

    I visited N.Y.C. for the 1st time in April and I fell in love! Such good food and so much going on. I'm from sleepy Aiken S.C. I love watching you and your pretty dresses on GMA! What is your favorite restaurant/food? Do you take the subway or cab that early in the morning? Don't you just love N.Y.C?!?!

    I visited N.Y.C. for the 1st time in April and I fell in love! Such good food and so much going on. I'm from sleepy Aiken S.C. I love watching you and your pretty dresses on GMA! What is your favorite restaurant/food? Do you take the subway or cab that early in the morning? Don't you just love N.Y.C?!?!

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      Thank you for the compliment on my dresses. It's very nice. So thank you. As for my favorite food and type of restaurant, I'm really into just straight sushi. I like a good sashimi. I'll allow myself a roll here and there. There's one-- a Pink Lady it's called, it's a very simple roll. I like that a lot.

      Thank you for the compliment on my dresses. It's very nice. So thank you. As for my favorite food and type of restaurant, I'm really into just straight sushi. I like a good sashimi. I'll allow myself a roll here and there. There's one-- a Pink Lady it's called, it's a very simple roll. I like that a lot.

  • Lydia Baker 83

    Hey Ginger, let me just start off by saying that I am a huge fan and I love you so much!! My question for you is, what is your favorite thing about being a wife and a mother. What gets you out of bed in mornings besides you have to, what things make it amazing to be a wife to Ben and a momma to Adrian! 😘

    Hey Ginger, let me just start off by saying that I am a huge fan and I love you so much!! My question for you is, what is your favorite thing about being a wife and a mother. What gets you out of bed in mornings besides you have to, what things make it amazing to be a wife to Ben and a momma to Adrian! 😘

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      I never thought that I would be here. Honestly, for so long, my career was first. Everything I did was about storms and about being on television. That was my life. And if you would have asked me five years ago if I would be sitting here talking about this, I would have said, 'Absolutely not.' I didn't think it was possible. A lot of my relationships took the back seat and then didn't go well. I met Ben, and it changed. I respect him and know that as a partner we have this thing, something special, and something different than anyone I'd ever been with. Obviously having a child (changed things tremendously for the better). It's funny because people will say, "Wow, I really see the difference in you this last year. It must be Dancing With the Stars." I'm like, "Nope. I had a baby." And that is the biggest change. Knowing that I have something outside of my career, because I really never did, aside from, you know, family at home -- your mind gets so focused. Any time something goes wrong now, I always know I have (my husband and my baby). And that's the most beautiful support and most lovely part of life. And I think I've learned to prioritize as much as I can. I'm still learning. I think it's a constant progression. I'm so far from perfect. But Ben is a great communicator. And he'll say, "Hey, remember -- we gotta do us first." And he pushes us to have the right balance.

      I never thought that I would be here. Honestly, for so long, my career was first. Everything I did was about storms and about being on television. That was my life. And if you would have asked me five years ago if I would be sitting here talking about this, I would have said, 'Absolutely not.' I didn't think it was possible. A lot of my relationships took the back seat and then didn't go well. I met Ben, and it changed. I respect him and know that as a partner we have this thing, something special, and something different than anyone I'd ever been with. Obviously having a child (changed things tremendously for the better). It's funny because people will say, "Wow, I really see the difference in you this last year. It must be Dancing With the Stars." I'm like, "Nope. I had a baby." And that is the biggest change. Knowing that I have something outside of my career, because I really never did, aside from, you know, family at home -- your mind gets so focused. Any time something goes wrong now, I always know I have (my husband and my baby). And that's the most beautiful support and most lovely part of life. And I think I've learned to prioritize as much as I can. I'm still learning. I think it's a constant progression. I'm so far from perfect. But Ben is a great communicator. And he'll say, "Hey, remember -- we gotta do us first." And he pushes us to have the right balance.

  • namisha
    namisha Inquisitive, Avid Reader, Food Lover, Amateur Chef, Digital Sensei
    3y ago New York, NY, United States

    Why did you get interested in meteorology?

    Why did you get interested in meteorology?

  • kevin
    kevin Global Partnerships Lead
    3y ago New York, NY, United States

    Hey Ginger! Adrian is so cute, tell him I said hi LOL! In terms of becoming a meteorologist, what was the biggest obstacle or setback that you have come across? How did you overcome it and what did you learn from it? Thanks in advance :)

    Hey Ginger! Adrian is so cute, tell him I said hi LOL! In terms of becoming a meteorologist, what was the biggest obstacle or setback that you have come across? How did you overcome it and what did you learn from it? Thanks in advance :)

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      I think the biggest setback for me has been labeling. Calling me a 'weather girl' is the worst thing you could say to me. I'm a meteorologist. That is my label. I think it's very easy for people (to call me a 'weather girl') because they just rely on what they know stereotypically of the past. And there were weather girls and weather men. There still are some. But I think the general trend is that everyone is going to science. You have to know what you're talking about (when it comes to forecasting the weather). They're not going to pay two people, someone behind the scenes and someone in front, to do this job. So I think (it's important to recognize that) things can change and that a woman wearing a dress can also be a scientist. I am on a crusade to get that out there because I think it's a really important topic for young women-- especially children in general. But I still feel like I could go out on the street right now, and if I get recognized, 50% or more of the population is going to say, "You're the weather girl." And that's upsetting. That needs to change. We need to (better) inform and educate the public because labels are important in many parts of life. My mom's a nurse practitioner. She has three master's degrees and has worked her whole life. So for her to be called a 'candy striper' is an equivalent, you know (of me being called a 'weather girl.'). We've moved on from those days of 'weather girls.' We are career scientists. It's definitely a top priority for me to get that out there.

      I think the biggest setback for me has been labeling. Calling me a 'weather girl' is the worst thing you could say to me. I'm a meteorologist. That is my label. I think it's very easy for people (to call me a 'weather girl') because they just rely on what they know stereotypically of the past. And there were weather girls and weather men. There still are some. But I think the general trend is that everyone is going to science. You have to know what you're talking about (when it comes to forecasting the weather). They're not going to pay two people, someone behind the scenes and someone in front, to do this job. So I think (it's important to recognize that) things can change and that a woman wearing a dress can also be a scientist. I am on a crusade to get that out there because I think it's a really important topic for young women-- especially children in general. But I still feel like I could go out on the street right now, and if I get recognized, 50% or more of the population is going to say, "You're the weather girl." And that's upsetting. That needs to change. We need to (better) inform and educate the public because labels are important in many parts of life. My mom's a nurse practitioner. She has three master's degrees and has worked her whole life. So for her to be called a 'candy striper' is an equivalent, you know (of me being called a 'weather girl.'). We've moved on from those days of 'weather girls.' We are career scientists. It's definitely a top priority for me to get that out there.

  • aliceinwonderland101

    Hi Ginger - Such a big fan. Do you have such a thing as a favorite weather story that you've covered? Is there such a thing as a favorite kind of weather to cover? And this may sound silly - but does bad weather ever affect you or get you down (like it does with most of the rest of us)?

    Hi Ginger - Such a big fan. Do you have such a thing as a favorite weather story that you've covered? Is there such a thing as a favorite kind of weather to cover? And this may sound silly - but does bad weather ever affect you or get you down (like it does with most of the rest of us)?

    • Ginger Zee
      Ginger Zee Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America
      3y ago

      It always comes off wrong, I think, when people ask me, "What's your favorite type of weather to cover?" My favorite type to *forecast* would be severe weather or a tornado. For me, that's what I've spent so much of my education focused on. I had storm-chasing as a class in college. So we actually got to go and storm chase for three credits for ten days in the plains. And I found in that first experience that learning from the atmosphere, smelling it-- you know, feeling it, watching a thunderstorm and then eventually a tornado form, there is no better way to learn. It's such a big part of our science. And there's a way to do it in an educational and safe and scientific way, and that's what we did in college. So from that moment, I feel like that's stayed my favorite type of story to cover. Now, of course what happened to me is I went to college and I said, "I just want to do meteorology," I thought I'd be in research for a university at some point. I got an internship in television, and that's what changed. So suddenly I was, like, focused on the communication of the science, even though I finished with the bachelor of science in meteorology, I have minors in Spanish and math, like, nothing TV. I did internships. And for me what was so interesting in my career as I started, you know, in radio and a PBS station, then in Flint, Michigan, and it wasn't until I was in Grand Rapids until I really got out in the field covering these stories. And the first big storm I covered was Hurricane Katrina. And I remember on the way thing thinking, "Oh my gosh, scientifically this was gonna be so fascinating." I was gonna see the storm surge and it was gonna be crazy and I was gonna do this. And it was crazy for about 20 minutes after, you know, the storm had passed and it was wild. But then the human part hit me, and that was the first time in my career, you know, at 24 or whatever it was, and I had been on TV for five years at that point, that I sat back and I realized, "This is-- this is what I have to do." This is such a big part of my journey is being able to tell these stories. So Katrina got me that humanity-- it taught me that there's so much beyond the actual storm-- to stop being a science nerd. You gotta turn into a human. And you do. Fast. That storm, I hope will never be rivaled in my lifetime because it was unreal what happened. And I hate what happened while I was there, but it taught me so much going forward. When I go and say, "A tornado - It's my favorite type of storm to cover," though, I feel like (with a tornado, at least) we can forecast. We've gotten really good at it. And I think at the network level we're doing something now - being ahead of it, warning you ahead of it. And that wasn't done for a very long time. When I came in and talked to the president of ABC News, when he was interviewing me (for a job at ABC News), I said, "That's what I wanna do. I wanna put that warning out there rather than damage chasing and just being there for that." But to absolutely answer your question, my favorite weather story I've ever done is-- after the Moore tornado in 2013. Moore, Oklahoma, was taken for a second time in 2013, because in 1999 an F5 went through there. This time it was in 2013, also in May. And it was-- an EF5, so similar strength. The paths, while both in Moore, crossed only at one point. And World News producers asked me, "Hey, why don't you find that person or the people who were hit by both?" And I'm like, "I can't believe we're gonna find that." And I was a little like, "Eh, I don't know. I don't know." I was really tired from being on for four days straight chasing all these storms. And we get to this place, and standing in a plastic poncho is 93-year-old Nancy E. Davis, this woman who had her home hit by both F5s, EF5 and F5-- both Moore tornadoes. She was-- I believe it was one in 3 trillion chance or something. I have to look up the number. But her story, finding that character to connect to such a horrific event and then telling her story of survival, that was my favorite. Also because she was so hopeful and so wonderful. And if you have a chance-- I don't know, it's just a story that I think everybody should watch. It's such a great story, and it's all about her.

      It always comes off wrong, I think, when people ask me, "What's your favorite type of weather to cover?" My favorite type to *forecast* would be severe weather or a tornado. For me, that's what I've spent so much of my education focused on. I had storm-chasing as a class in college. So we actually got to go and storm chase for three credits for ten days in the plains. And I found in that first experience that learning from the atmosphere, smelling it-- you know, feeling it, watching a thunderstorm and then eventually a tornado form, there is no better way to learn. It's such a big part of our science. And there's a way to do it in an educational and safe and scientific way, and that's what we did in college. So from that moment, I feel like that's stayed my favorite type of story to cover. Now, of course what happened to me is I went to college and I said, "I just want to do meteorology," I thought I'd be in research for a university at some point. I got an internship in television, and that's what changed. So suddenly I was, like, focused on the communication of the science, even though I finished with the bachelor of science in meteorology, I have minors in Spanish and math, like, nothing TV. I did internships. And for me what was so interesting in my career as I started, you know, in radio and a PBS station, then in Flint, Michigan, and it wasn't until I was in Grand Rapids until I really got out in the field covering these stories. And the first big storm I covered was Hurricane Katrina. And I remember on the way thing thinking, "Oh my gosh, scientifically this was gonna be so fascinating." I was gonna see the storm surge and it was gonna be crazy and I was gonna do this. And it was crazy for about 20 minutes after, you know, the storm had passed and it was wild. But then the human part hit me, and that was the first time in my career, you know, at 24 or whatever it was, and I had been on TV for five years at that point, that I sat back and I realized, "This is-- this is what I have to do." This is such a big part of my journey is being able to tell these stories. So Katrina got me that humanity-- it taught me that there's so much beyond the actual storm-- to stop being a science nerd. You gotta turn into a human. And you do. Fast. That storm, I hope will never be rivaled in my lifetime because it was unreal what happened. And I hate what happened while I was there, but it taught me so much going forward. When I go and say, "A tornado - It's my favorite type of storm to cover," though, I feel like (with a tornado, at least) we can forecast. We've gotten really good at it. And I think at the network level we're doing something now - being ahead of it, warning you ahead of it. And that wasn't done for a very long time. When I came in and talked to the president of ABC News, when he was interviewing me (for a job at ABC News), I said, "That's what I wanna do. I wanna put that warning out there rather than damage chasing and just being there for that." But to absolutely answer your question, my favorite weather story I've ever done is-- after the Moore tornado in 2013. Moore, Oklahoma, was taken for a second time in 2013, because in 1999 an F5 went through there. This time it was in 2013, also in May. And it was-- an EF5, so similar strength. The paths, while both in Moore, crossed only at one point. And World News producers asked me, "Hey, why don't you find that person or the people who were hit by both?" And I'm like, "I can't believe we're gonna find that." And I was a little like, "Eh, I don't know. I don't know." I was really tired from being on for four days straight chasing all these storms. And we get to this place, and standing in a plastic poncho is 93-year-old Nancy E. Davis, this woman who had her home hit by both F5s, EF5 and F5-- both Moore tornadoes. She was-- I believe it was one in 3 trillion chance or something. I have to look up the number. But her story, finding that character to connect to such a horrific event and then telling her story of survival, that was my favorite. Also because she was so hopeful and so wonderful. And if you have a chance-- I don't know, it's just a story that I think everybody should watch. It's such a great story, and it's all about her.

  • Suzie
    3y ago San Francisco, CA, United States

    What does your job consist of? Thanks.

    What does your job consist of? Thanks.


Ginger Zee
Emmy-Award-Winning Meteorologist for ABC News/ Good Morning America

Ginger Zee is “Good Morning America’s” chief meteorologist, reporting on the nation’s weather throughout the morning broadcast. Previously she was weather anchor for the weekend edition of “Good Morning America.” Additionally, Zee reports across all ABC News broadcasts and digital platforms and [...]

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